StoriesHere Podcast https://storieshere.com Museum leaders tell great stories Mon, 11 Oct 2021 22:57:38 +0000 en hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 Places like museums and science centers are time machines....and places of great learning. In these conversations with their leaders you hear some of the best of their stories. Thank you for listening! Wayne Parker clean episodic Wayne Parker waynejparker@gmail.com waynejparker@gmail.com (Wayne Parker) StoriesHere 2021 Great stories from museum leaders and more... StoriesHere Podcast https://www.storieshere.com/wp-content/uploads/powerpress/image777.jpg https://storieshere.com TV-Y Every other week Lowell Observatory FAQ: Where is God? https://storieshere.com/2021/06/lowell-observatory-faq-where-is-god/ Wed, 16 Jun 2021 14:34:34 +0000 https://storieshere.com/?p=2345 A conversation with Dr. Jeff Hall, Director That Frequently Asked Question, ‘Where is God?’, is one of many the staff hears at the Lowell Observatory, especially during astronomy nights.  In this wide-ranging conversation with Lowell’s Director, Dr. Jeff Hall, we talk about everything from that to Venus and Mars, space debris, the connection between music and astronomy, and much, much more. The Lowell Observatory is a time machine, from its study of the origins of the universe, to a future of life on other planets, to the hurdles we may be putting up with so many spacecraft in the sky.  To learn more and support the observatory, go to Lowell.edu. And here’s a story about the total solar eclipse discussed in this episode. Transcript Intro with music: Welcome to the StoriesHere Podcast Dr. Jeff Hall, Director, Lowell Observatory: I had several people come up to me literally in tears. They were so overwhelmed, particularly if they’ve never seen a total eclipse before. It’s a pretty amazing experience. And I think it’s that absolute wonder and awe of what we see when we look into the cosmos. Wayne Parker, Host, StoriesHere Podcast That’s Dr. Jeff Hall, director of the Lowell Observatory, talking about the 2017 total solar eclipse which he hosted on a live program with the Science Channel that was viewed by 1.6 million people. That group was gathered in Madras, Oregon on a high school football field and it was reported that after the eclipse passed, they cheered, “Do it again.” Wayne Parker: This is Wayne Parker, host of the StoriesHere Podcast. And on that day, I was about 100 miles to the west in Corvallis, Oregon and experienced totality about three minutes before it reached to Jeff’s Science Channel group. So at 10:18 that morning of August 21st, 2017, we stood in a public park and watched as the sun was totally blocked by the moon plunging our world into darkness. Streetlights came on, and it was truly one of those feelings were words can’t do justice. In addition to things like explaining eclipses on television, as the director of Lowell Observatory, Jeff helps lead a center that Time magazine named one of the world’s 100 most important places. Are you surprised that this place outside Flagstaff, Arizona, is on a list of the world’s most important places along the Great Wall of China and the Roman Colosseum? There are many more surprises in today’s StoriesHere episode. Thank you for joining us. I’m your host, Wayne Parker, our adviser is museum expert Alice Parman, and original music is by George Davidson. And did you know the Planet Pluto was discovered at Lowell? More on that to come. It’s also a major education center and has been called America’s observatory. So in their education role, I asked next about any visitor comments that Jeff particularly remembers. Jeff Hall: An email will land in my inbox from a mom somewhere and saying literally, you changed my kid’s life because of the experience they had here and the high opening of views they got and the exposure they got to astronomy and science. And knowing that we have positively impacted a young life and maybe inspired a scientist of the next generation, that’s amazingly satisfying and definitely part of why we do what we do. Wayne Parker: And how do you look at that bridge between the research and the outreach, because you have a big staff there, you have all these research going on and historically, Lowell is known for real breakthroughs, the discovery of Pluto, really crucial background in understanding the Big Bang. And yet, you do a great conjunction at Christmas last year. There were 75,000 people live paying attention to that and over two million views on YouTube. Jeff, what’s the source of all that interest in astronomy and how do you capitalize on it in that way? Jeff Hall: Well, the connection goes all the way back to our founder, Percival Lowell, who believed very firmly that astronomical dis... A conversation with Dr. Jeff Hall, Director

That Frequently Asked Question, ‘Where is God?’, is one of many the staff hears at the Lowell Observatory, especially during astronomy nights.  In this wide-ranging conversation with Lowell’s Director, Dr. Jeff Hall, we talk about everything from that to Venus and Mars, space debris, the connection between music and astronomy, and much, much more.

The Lowell Observatory is a time machine, from its study of the origins of the universe, to a future of life on other planets, to the hurdles we may be putting up with so many spacecraft in the sky.  To learn more and support the observatory, go to Lowell.edu.

And here’s a story about the total solar eclipse discussed in this episode.


Transcript

Intro with music: Welcome to the StoriesHere Podcast

Dr. Jeff Hall, Director, Lowell Observatory:

I had several people come up to me literally in tears. They were so overwhelmed, particularly if they’ve never seen a total eclipse before. It’s a pretty amazing experience. And I think it’s that absolute wonder and awe of what we see when we look into the cosmos.

Wayne Parker, Host, StoriesHere Podcast

That’s Dr. Jeff Hall, director of the Lowell Observatory, talking about the 2017 total solar eclipse which he hosted on a live program with the Science Channel that was viewed by 1.6 million people. That group was gathered in Madras, Oregon on a high school football field and it was reported that after the eclipse passed, they cheered, “Do it again.”

Wayne Parker:

This is Wayne Parker, host of the StoriesHere Podcast. And on that day, I was about 100 miles to the west in Corvallis, Oregon and experienced totality about three minutes before it reached to Jeff’s Science Channel group. So at 10:18 that morning of August 21st, 2017, we stood in a public park and watched as the sun was totally blocked by the moon plunging our world into darkness. Streetlights came on, and it was truly one of those feelings were words can’t do justice.

In addition to things like explaining eclipses on television, as the director of Lowell Observatory, Jeff helps lead a center that Time magazine named one of the world’s 100 most important places. Are you surprised that this place outside Flagstaff, Arizona, is on a list of the world’s most important places along the Great Wall of China and the Roman Colosseum?

There are many more surprises in today’s StoriesHere episode. Thank you for joining us. I’m your host, Wayne Parker, our adviser is museum expert Alice Parman, and original music is by George Davidson.

And did you know the Planet Pluto was discovered at Lowell? More on that to come. It’s also a major education center and has been called America’s observatory. So in their education role, I asked next about any visitor comments that Jeff particularly remembers.

Jeff Hall:

An email will land in my inbox from a mom somewhere and saying literally, you changed my kid’s life because of the experience they had here and the high opening of views they got and the exposure they got to astronomy and science. And knowing that we have positively impacted a young life and maybe inspired a scientist of the next generation, that’s amazingly satisfying and definitely part of why we do what we do.

Wayne Parker:

And how do you look at that bridge between the research and the outreach, because you have a big staff there, you have all these research going on and historically, Lowell is known for real breakthroughs, the discovery of Pluto, really crucial background in understanding the Big Bang. And yet, you do a great conjunction at Christmas last year. There were 75,000 people live paying attention to that and over two million views on YouTube. Jeff, what’s the source of all that interest in astronomy and how do you capitalize on it in that way?

Jeff Hall:

Well, the connection goes all the way back to our founder, Percival Lowell, who believed very firmly that astronomical discovery should not just be confined to academia but should be shared broadly with public. And in fact, the way he often put it was that any member of the public should be able to experience the excitement of discovery in a way that makes them feel like co-discoverers. Like they are discovering this and becoming aware of it in tandem with the researchers. And we carry that through the present day and we don’t …

Jeff Hall:

Sometimes we talk about ourselves as having a dual mission of research and outreach, but I’ve increasingly started to not like that way of putting it because it creates silos. Really what we do is communicate about the nature of the universe and we communicate that to professional audiences, through the peer review journals and scientific conferences and proceedings. We communicate that to the public at a more accessible but no less rigorous incredible level. And it’s all part of unified mission of communicating the excitement and wonder and awe of the universe to everybody.

Jeff Hall:

And it was tremendous to have 75,000 people tuned in for the conjunction. I think the reason that kind of caught lighting in a bottle was the media, of course, hyped it tremendously and a number of the leading media feeds picked up on our stream and advertise it. So we were front and center on some of the most visited websites in the world. And I think that drew a lot of people to our live stream.

Jeff Hall:

One of the other ones that really generated a lot of views, I think we had … Oh, I don’t know, maybe 10,000 tuned in a couple of years ago was the transit of Mercury across the face of the sun. And the comments that came in during that one were saying, “Wow, this is the best stream out there because this is real working, professional astronomers talking about real science and the science of transits and the science of planets and exoplanets.”

Jeff Hall:

So that’s what we try to do is fused the excellence of our research and the results and credibility from a world class group of faculty members and postdocs and students with this communication to the public in an accurate and totally scientifically credible way.

Wayne Parker:

And that’s built on this base of some natural curiosity that many people have about the skies, and about the stars. And especially certain phenomena, in 2017, I was able to be in the path of the total solar eclipse, and it was unlike anything I’d ever experienced. And I couldn’t really describe it. I couldn’t put it into words but it was astonishing, and I think that’s what a lot of people experienced they have when they look into the stars and when they learn things about what’s in the sky, right?

Jeff Hall:

It is hard to describe. We did an event in Madras, Oregon for the 2017 eclipse, right on the center line and we had about 3,500 people at our event. We rented basically a football field at the local high school. And indeed, I and one of our astronomers were narrating the eclipse. The Science Channel actually came up and covered it. And so we were doing a play by play but after totality ended, I was kind of wandering around the in-field of the football field and just saying hi and thanking people for coming to our event.

Jeff Hall:

And I had several people come up to me literally in tears. They were so overwhelmed particularly if they’ve never seen a total eclipse before. It’s a pretty amazing experience. And I think it’s that absolute wonder and awe of what we see when we look into the cosmos that excites people and stokes this interest. When New Horizons flew past Pluto in 2015, that iconic picture of the heart on Pluto was above the fold of practically every newspaper on the planet. And NASA’s website got whatever plus a billion hits.

 

These kinds of things unify humanity. They’re not about any particular nation or any particular race. They speak to every human being, and I think it’s that sense of exploration and the unknown and awe that makes astronomy such an attractive and interesting and inspiring subject for all of us.

Wayne Parker:

So I’m curious about where this started for you. You have a PhD. You went to Johns Hopkins and Penn State, astronomy and astrophysics and now, you’ve come to this position. Was there in a time in your life when you were young in which you said where you felt that inspiration hit?

Jeff Hall:

Well, it probably grew on me throughout later elementary, middle and high school. I was always interested in numerous different areas of science whether that was physiology or entomology, microbiology, whatever. But yeah, I did end up getting a small telescope in middle school and some really good reference books that I poured through.

 

By the time I got to college, I entered college as a physics major very much anticipating that astronomy was the direction I was going to go. So yeah, it goes way back.

Wayne Parker:

If we go back to that elementary school time and we talk to Jeff in elementary school and we tell him that at this stage of his life, you’re going to be doing this in this position. How surprised would he have been on a scale of 1 to 10 with 10 being the most surprised?

Jeff Hall:

Well, probably 10. I would never … Growing up in Southside, Virginia, I would never have imagined myself ending up living in Arizona which is a very different place from Virginia. I love living here, but no. I was certainly at that age even aware of Lowell Observatory reading Cosmos by Carl Sagan. Of course, he mentions Percival Lowell and Lowell’s studies of Mars. There was even a picture from the Clark Telescope which is right up the hill from my office here.

Jeff Hall:

I was aware of the observatory and its contributions of discovering Pluto and Percival, but no, it never would have remotely crossed my mind that I would end up working here.

Wayne Parker:

So you just mentioned Carl Sagan and so, I’ve seen reference to Percival Lowell was sort of Carl Sagan before Carl Sagan. Is that how you think about it?

Jeff Hall:

Yeah, he has been called the Carl Sagan of his day and that he was a tremendous popularizer of astronomy. Many of the leading science fiction writers of the 20th century such as Edgar Rice Burroughs or H.G. Wells drew inspiration from Lowell. Although a number of his ideas were controversial such as life and intelligent constructions on Mars, he certainly brought attention to the field and popularized it and set an interesting precedent by founding an observatory.

This observatory today, I mean, we are a nonprofit research institution, 501(c)(3). But our origin is we’re not a national observatory. We don’t trace to that kind of origin. We were created essentially by an individual’s inspiration and philanthropy and dedication of resources to something he believed in very deeply. And that’s quite a legacy, I think, that Percival leaves to the world.

Wayne Parker:

And he has three, as I understand, craters named after him on three different planets and an asteroid named after him. It was all of these and yet, he is also famously known for being wrong, as you say, about there being Martians and maybe originated a little bit that term that’s so common in our culture now. Is there some lesson in that and that you can be famously wrong and still make a big contribution?

Jeff Hall:

Yeah. And virtually, every scientist is wrong to a level and that science is always uncertain. Results are rarely ironclad. I mean, there’s a great example is even Isaac Newton was in restricted sense of Newtonian mechanics wrong and that there are areas of planetary motion that can’t be explained purely by Newtonian mechanics. You need Einstein’s general relativity to do it and that builds on what Newton developed.

Jeff Hall:

Now, Lowell’s ideas about canals and intelligent life on Mars were entirely wrong. But the rovers and various missions exploring Mars had made it pretty clear that there was once substantial water on Mars. There may still be these briny seeps that we’re finding. And these latest missions may well turn up evidence of past life on Mars. There may be life elsewhere in the solar system. Interestingly, the icy moons of the outer solar system seemed to be emerging as likely areas where there might be subterranean oceans and possibly life could exist.

Jeff Hall:

Lowell was significantly wrong about his particular ideas of life on Mars, but the general idea of life elsewhere in the universe probably points in the right direction. He was right about the existence of bodies in the solar system past Neptune. Pluto was not exactly what he was looking for. His Planet X he ambition was a considerably more massive object than Pluto, but he was right about the general idea that there was much more in the solar system than the eight classical planets and various small bodies known at that time.

Jeff Hall:

And then finally, we are most famous for the discovery of Pluto perhaps, as well as, Percival’s theories of life on Mars. But in 1912, he also directed then staff scientist Vesto Slipher, to do observations of these odd things called spiral nebulae at that time. They didn’t know what they were, of course, now we understand they are other galaxies. And Slipher with The Clark Telescope right up the hill here on the campus made the very first observations of cosmological red shifts that led to the Big Bang theory and the idea of the expansion of the universe.

Jeff Hall:

Lowell put in motion a number of things that had profound impacts on our understanding of the solar system and the universe. And so, in that sense, he did science and astronomical discovery a great deal of good in addition to his popularizing.

Wayne Parker:

I have so many questions on those things that you just said. Let’s start with Pluto, and it was discovered there and it was named by a young woman, an 11-year-old. How in the world did that happen?

Jeff Hall:

Well, I mean, suggestions poured in from around the world as to what the planet should be called. And the staff at that time and the trustee decided Pluto made a huge amount of sense since it was in line with the naming scheme of the other planets for the gods of antiquity. Pluto was the god of the underworld. And so for a very cold, distant object creeping through the dark depths of the outer solar system, that seemed appropriate.

Jeff Hall:

And then, of course, it starts with PL, which happens to be Percival Lowell’s initials. It made the most sense and they went with that when they decided to announce the name of the planet.

Wayne Parker:

I read that that 11-year-old’s name was Venetia Burney. I wonder what the rest of her life, and this was 1930. I wonder what the rest of her life would be like if you’re in a cocktail party and said what are you known for, and said, “Well, I named Pluto.”

Jeff Hall:

Actually, one story I like about that is Clyde Tombaugh, who was also quite young. He came to Lowell as a fledgling 22-year-old out of Kansas and was put to work on the Pluto search. And very quickly, relatively speaking, found Pluto on these pair of plates that he took in late January of 1930. And in analyzing the plates and studying them and looking for things that were moving, he noticed this thing moving. And at that time, Vesto Slipher, who had done the red shift observations, was the director of the observatory.

Jeff Hall:

And Clyde lived and worked at the other end of the hall here in the Cipher building and he came down the hall, and right into this very office I’m sitting in right now and said, “Dr. Slipher, I have found your planet X.” And I get goosebumps whenever I tell that story because imagine what Clyde must have felt as this early 20-something having made that kind of a discovery, and a discovery that was going to make Lowell Observatory world famous forever.

Jeff Hall:

Yeah, it’s heavy stuff when you make a really cool discovery like that.

Wayne Parker:

So what Clyde did is some combination of diligence, and also I presumed, really good timing and a little bit of the roll of a dice?

Jeff Hall:

A little bit of all that. Clyde certainly, diligence, persistence, meticulous attention to detail searching these hundreds of pairs of photographic plates by eye and looking for what turned out to be this very faint object. Pluto is about 14th magnitude in the astronomer’s crazy brightness scale where by the time you’re down to 14th magnitude, you’re just in a sea of stars. And so picking that out took tremendous attention to detail. And I have great admiration for Clyde’s persistence and care.

Jeff Hall:

Certainly, there was a bit of luck. Percival spent years calculating where he would expect a trans-Neptunian planet to be based on what appeared to be perturbations that you wouldn’t expect in the motions of Uranus and Neptune. Pluto, it turned out it was discovered within about two degrees of where Lowell predicted it would be purely serendipitous.

Jeff Hall:

As it turns out, Pluto is not nearly massive enough to have significant enough gravitational influence to affect the motions of other planets. It turned out that was just some inaccuracies in measurement. But nevertheless, it turned out very close to where he predicted it would be. And sometimes those amazing seeming coincidences happen in science.

Jeff Hall:

They’re low probability events. But that’s how probability works. You look at enough events and do enough things, every now and then something really weird is going to happen and it’s not magic. It’s not voodoo or anything. It’s just how the probability of events works. And in this case, it led to the discovery of a planet.

Wayne Parker:

Did I read correctly that that diameter of Pluto was about half the width of the United States?

Jeff Hall:

Yeah, something like that. It’s quite small.

Wayne Parker:

You have said Pluto is your favorite planet. And yet in 2006, a group took a vote and said it was no longer a planet. What were your emotions when you first heard that?

Jeff Hall:

First of all, the famous “demotion” of Pluto by the IAU ultimately was good for Lowell. We must have spent, I don’t know, two or three days solid after that announcement with press from all over the world. And we took a nuanced approached to it. Obviously, it stirred up a lot of emotions. It’s sort of, “Oh, it’s a planet. Oh, it’s not a planet.” The way we framed our initial argument was, “Look, regardless of what you call it, it’s a fascinating world.” We have a little spaceship on the way there right now. One of astronomers is one of the mission leaders and Pluto, regardless of what you call it, is going to have a lot to tell us about the origin and history and evolution of our solar system and about its distant past.

Jeff Hall:

We stayed out of the fray at that time because there was no way to get into it without either sounding like whiners or just whatever. Now, more recently, as we’ve gone to Pluto now. We flew by in 2015, and saw what an amazing world it is with its diverse surface, evidence of active geologic processes. This isn’t one of those dead crater rocks that you sometimes see. There’s active stuff going on which you can clearly see from the smooth terrain in Sputnik Planitia.

Jeff Hall:

It’s got five moons. It’s got an atmosphere. And my feeling now is it is very reasonable to call Pluto a planet, and it’s not just Lowell Observatory Pluto macho kind of thing. There’s probably quite a few other objects in the solar system that would be worthy of being called planets if you use a sensible definition. We think, first of all, the current IAU definition of a planet has some indefensible and non-scientific components to it, and also the message that we sent …

Jeff Hall:

I talked earlier in the podcast here about inspiring young minds and encouraging the scientists of the next generation. The worldwide message that we sent to all those kids was that the way we do science is by vote, and that’s not how you do science. You do science on the basis of data and defensible arguments, not by at the last the day of conference with only 10% of the attendees left and take a vote.

At some point on your podcast, you’ll have to get our astronomer, Gerard van Belle on here because he was at that conference and he has a wonderful talk about how that all went down.

Wayne Parker:

Well, that all makes sense in terms of an organizational response. Do you remember at the moment that you heard the news what your gut response was?

Jeff Hall:

I don’t so much … I was so busy talking on the phone and trying to inject a little bit of just measured response and not just fly off the handle. I mean, I don’t remember sitting around in the evening in a blue funk or anything. It’s not like that.

Wayne Parker:

Well, one of the things I remember in the study of Pluto is just the information that was conveyed about how far away it is just to still be in the solar system, to be three billion miles away, five light hours. It took nine years for the space craft to get there.

Jeff Hall:

Right. That’s a really, really fast spacecraft too. That’s probably the fastest thing we’ve ever launched because the strategy that Alan Stern and Jim took was build the lightest possible thing you can that will still do the job and have all the necessary instrument payloads and put it on top of the biggest fattest rocket we’ve got and load it up with extra boosters and just fling it out there as fast as you possibly can, and it still took nine years.

Jeff Hall:

And then the risk or the challenge of orchestrating the flyby with the light travel time of four to five hours, everything has got to be preloaded and ready to go and the little ship has just got to do its thing on autopilot as it goes by at 32,000 miles an hour, however fast it was going. So, it was quite a technical achievement that we all can be very proud of.

Wayne Parker:

I think it helped all of the rest of us get a sense of scope because that’s just the solar system, just our solar system.

Jeff Hall:

Yeah. Our solar system is this teensy little speck in the context of the entire galaxy. And even the distances to the nearest stars are hundreds of thousands of times the full extent of the solar system. It’s a big place out there.

Wayne Parker:

Your world is so front and center in the public eye now. And I’m going to ask in a minute about how that’s changed over your career but I was thinking recently about seeing the fact that the images of a drone flying at Mars and then a Saturday Night Live skit about Mars. What do you think when you see the popularization of, well, astronomy in general but let’s talk particularly about Mars right now?

Jeff Hall:

Well, I think it’s great. It spurs interests in the field. It’s inspiring. So much of the news these days, of course, is just abysmal to read and listen to whether it’s the pandemic or worldwide strife in whatever country it happens to be. And I felt sort of that same kind of rush when Perseverance landed and they got through that harebrained seven-minute descent sequence.

Jeff Hall:

I felt the same kind of rush that I felt on July 14, 2015 when the images came in from Pluto and you knew that New Horizons was cruising past this planet three and a half billion miles away. It uplifts us and inspires us and shows us the very best things, the very coolest things that humanity can do. And that’s an important message, and it’s why astronomy is exciting and I think relevant in our lives.

Jeff Hall:

And that relevance translates to public interests and support for the whole enterprise. All of these missions Perseverance, New Horizons, they’re federally funded. They come from taxpayer dollars through NASA or through the National Science Foundation. It’s imperative for scientists to engage very genuinely in returning the results and the excitement of those missions to the public, who ultimately fund them and make them possible.

Wayne Parker:

I had a couple of questions we hinted about beyond the solar system. And the observatory was instrumental in the early understanding of the Big Bang Theory. And my sort of personal question about that is it’s said that we are all just stardust and that’s kind of hard for some of us to wrap our minds around. To what extent is that true and what does that mean to you personally?

Jeff Hall:

No, it’s very true. And in fact, the “we are stardust” theme is the central theme that we are weaving into our next mega project here at the observatory, which is our new astronomy discovery center. This a new, much larger visitor center than the one we currently have, much more state-of-the-art with some really neat marquee components that we think will be one of the premier astronomy destinations in the world. If fact, that’s kind of our vision, is to be the premier astronomy education destination in the world.

Jeff Hall:

And this idea of we are stardust and the idea that the atoms that comprise you, the matter and the energy, can be traced all the way back to the Big Bang. We have iron in our blood and that iron was forged in the thermonuclear processes in the core of a long dead star, perhaps billions of years ago and then blown out into the galaxy and eventually it forms into us, self-aware collections of atoms looking out and kind of contemplating our very own origins. And so that deep connectedness to the universe is another layer in how astronomy is so important and so relevant, I think, in all of our lives.

Jeff Hall:

Before we shut down for the virus we had weekly meeting astronomer nights. I would go over for those regularly. And there are always some questions that always come up every single night. First, is it a planet that everybody wants to know whether Pluto is a planet or not, and of course, this is the place to ask that. But people always want to know, where did the universe come from? What does the expansion of the universe really mean and frequently, where is God in all of this, whatever God is?

Jeff Hall:

And it’s a fascinating thing to talk about, talk about the boundary between evidence-based thinking and faith-based thinking and trying to appreciate the universe in those two different ways. It’s fun to talk about uncertainty in science and the basic principles, for example, of quantum mechanics and the difference between things that we don’t know about the universe and things that we can’t know because of limitations to our ability to measure things precisely or to perceive things. And I think getting across the message that the universe is an incredibly weird place, a place that operates on principles that are more probabilistic than deterministic at a microscopic level, it really stretches people’s perceptions.

Jeff Hall:

And that’s what we’re trying to get to, communicate that it is okay to be uncertain about stuff and not to know stuff. It’s okay to change your mind if the data indicate something doesn’t work the way that you thought it did. And imagine how more effectively we might have responded to COVID-19 initially with a very thorough data-driven, evidence-driven approach or how better our overall public discourse would be if we were all willing to step back and look at evidence and think about it and change our minds when the evidence demanded that we do so.

Jeff Hall:

So, this is exactly what we’re trying to get across in our stories and it traces right back to this concept that we are actually part of the universe that created us. And it’s a very neat story to tell and one that resonates with a lot of people.

Wayne Parker:

Part of that certainty, when you talk about that, I think about Vera Rubin who was one of the early people there at the observatory and one of the early females, and that she had a role in the discovery of dark matter which seems to me like kind of a placeholder because we don’t know exactly.

Jeff Hall:

I mean, dark matter, there’s some examples and we don’t know what it is. We detect its presence indirectly. And yes, Vera was right at the forefront of that and really should have gotten the Nobel Prize. I do think she was a member of our advisory for quite some time. An advancing illness prevented her from continuing but I remember having some … She was a helpful and thoughtful voice on the board for many years.

Jeff Hall:

So, yeah, and we were constantly discovering things about the universe that we don’t expect and it could be some of these pretty big things like, “Wow, all the galaxies appear to be rushing away from us,” which we first discovered in 1912. “Wow, the motions of stars and galaxies are really not doing what we expect,” so there’s got to be some sort of hidden gravitational influence which is what Vera was instrumental in developing.

Jeff Hall:

But it can also be much more seemingly mundane things, just like I do, observing sun-like stars year in and year out and see what they do. And unlike the sun which shows a pretty steady 11-year sunspot cycle, you see other stars do really strange things that you don’t expect and that create a lot of interesting risks for the theorists to model how those processes happened.

Jeff Hall:

This happens day in, day out, day in, day out in astronomy and we’re constantly adjusting what we think about the universe, changing our minds. You see this playing out in a different arena this year with the whole pandemic. There’s constantly changing guidance and a lot of the knee-jerk reaction you see on social media is, “Ah, these stupid scientists have changed their minds again.”

Jeff Hall:

Yes, that’s exactly what you do as we learn more and more about the virus and how it works. A responsible scientist changes his or her mind and issues guidance based on where the data are leading. And it’s always going to be so in science, and V.M. Slipher and Vera Rubin and many others have been a huge part of that.

Wayne Parker:

And this is Wayne Parker with the StoriesHere Podcast. I’m talking to Dr. Jeff Hall, who’s the director of the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona. Jeff, the theme that I take from your comments, a lot of it centers around curiosity. And I’ve read that you believe in academic freedom. Are those things connected?

Jeff Hall:

Absolutely, yeah. When we hire an astronomer on our staff, they get a scientific blank check. We don’t say, “Okay, this year, the observatory is focusing on this.” We let people explore whatever they want. And that allows people to do things that might not bear fruit immediately. It might take a while for a result to come out. It allows people to try maybe even slightly crazy things. I mean, you could argue that that goes right back to our beginning. Percival hypothesizing about life on Mars. He was wrong in the specifics but in the broader sense of inspiring thinking about life elsewhere in the universe, well, that starts to bear fruit over many decades as the technology becomes available to understand what’s going on under the surfaces of icy moons in the outer solar system or to detect and begin to understand the characteristics of planets around other stars is something that technology has only advanced to let us do in the past 25 years or so.

Jeff Hall:

Yeah, this complete freedom of inquiry is deeply programmed into how we handle things here at Lowell and one of our basic principles for doing science.

Wayne Parker:

So, you’re building on that basic principle and the technology keeps getting better in order to advance the knowledge that we all have and share. There seemed to be two things that might be stumbling blocks to that and you’re involved in both of them. And one would be the night sky situation that Flagstaff pioneered and the other is you’re a member of the American Astronomical Society’s standing committee on light pollution, space debris and radio interference. And so could you comment about those two things because it seems like those are defensive things? You’re trying to keep our civilization from getting in the way of the progress that we otherwise would make.

Jeff Hall:

Right. And again, we can say how many hours have we got left in the show because this is a big topic. But the steady degradation of the night sky through light pollution is an increasing issue for ground-based astronomy. Many of the great historic observatories for example in California were founded in the early part of the 20th century. So you have Lick, Mount Wilson, Palomar, awesome venerable facilities. And now, they’re all right next to these giant metro areas and the skies are increasingly compromised.

Jeff Hall:

You can say the same thing for the many facilities in Southern Arizona, the national observatory at Kitt Peak, in Mount Hopkins, Mount Graham as the Phoenix metro and to a lesser extent Tucson have grown.

Jeff Hall:

We are at a watershed era in preservation and protection of the night sky, and there’s two things that are causing that. The first is from the ground the conversion worldwide from legacy gas discharge systems, lighting systems such as high pressure sodium which is the de facto standard around much of the world to LED. And there are compelling reasons to use LEDs for outdoor lighting but as typically implemented, they will substantially increase the sky glow over a city.

Jeff Hall:

Lumen-for-lumen of white LED will create 1.5 to 2 times the sky glow of a high-pressure sodium lumens just because of the way the spectrum is distributed. Now, there are kinds of LEDs that mitigate that. There are the more yellowish ember LEDs that are more similar to high pressure sodium or the now obsolete low-pressure sodium. You also can use a lot less light with LEDs because they’re directional. You can eliminate light trespass but a lot of communities don’t do that.

Jeff Hall:

And so we are seeing a significant increase in sky glow worldwide, particularly acute obviously where it’s populated but the Eastern United States, Europe, heavily populated areas in China, Japan, it’s becoming a growing problem. And it’s not just for astronomy but there are ecological impacts. There are human health impacts to disruption of the natural cycle of light and dark. The medical community is paying a lot of attention. So, there’s that, this sort of the watershed in the LED revolution.

Jeff Hall:

And now, right now, we’re at another watershed in space with the advent of large constellations, as they’re called, of satellites. And one of the earliest or first constellations to go up is SpaceX Starlink. There are others in the works. These are broadband internet communication satellites potentially you could use low earth orbits for many other applications.

Jeff Hall:

And so what we’re seeing is where prior to the launch of Starlink, there were a few thousand active satellites, a few thousand dead satellites, some tens of thousands of pieces of space junk that are being tracked. But a handful of thousands of satellites and in fact, only about 200 when you see a satellite going by at night, there’s only about 200 of those that you can see with the unaided eye. Hubble Space Telescope, ISS are two well-known examples.

Jeff Hall:

Starlink alone is launching about that many, and has filed for many more. And then Amazon and OneWeb, other countries may well launch their own constellations. So, what really got astronomer’s attention was the brightness of the Starlink’s and the fact that there was the potential for many tens of thousands, even maybe over a hundred thousand once all the constellations were built out. So, this is a watershed moment in space for preservation of the night sky as well.

Jeff Hall:

I will say that SpaceX and Amazon and OneWeb have been extremely receptive and proactive in working with astronomy, working with our committee, with other astronomers to redesign their satellites to lower the brightness. They cannot eliminate the impact, not by a long shot. It does appear they will be able to make them faint enough that when they’re on station, they won’t be visible to the unaided eye. They’ll probably be seventh to ninth magnitude, maybe seventh to ninth magnitude which is too faint to just look up and see. But to a research telescope, it’s really bright.

Jeff Hall:

And it’s going to be an impact on ground-based possibly space-based astronomy as well as it gets crowded up there that we’re going to have to figure out how to deal with going forward and we’re working on it regularly. In fact, right after this podcast, I’ve got another call with a colleague about this very thing.

Wayne Parker:

This is Wayne Parker of the StoriesHere Podcast with amazing conversation today with Dr. Jeff Hall who’s the director of the Lowell Observatory, which is in Flagstaff, Arizona. His involvement extends to so many other things.

Wayne Parker:

You’re doing so much observation of the sky, but we’re not the first peoples to do that. The ancients did that for millennia. What have you learned from them?

Jeff Hall:

Astronomy is probably the oldest science. Our earliest ancestors looked up the sky and wondered what was going on. And this ultimately led to the birth, for example, of astrology and modern astronomers kind of poo-poo astrology of these days because I think we understand it’s not a correct way to interpret the motions of the objects. But as we talked about earlier in the podcast, we learned what’s right frequently by being completely wrong.

Jeff Hall:

And obviously, the motions of the sun throughout the year, the motions of planets in the sky, the appearance and the rising and setting of certain stars were tied to certain times of year, which meant the start of the growing season or the flooding season or the resurgence of crops. People’s lives quite understandably appeared inextricably tied in to the motions in the heavens. And so naturally, it was very natural to try and understand this and ascribe direct causal influence with the motions of the objects in the sky to what’s going on here on earth.

Jeff Hall:

Now today, our understanding has advanced considerably but we’ve built this understanding incrementally over the years, and it’s the willingness of these meticulous observers who cataloged the motions of stars and named them and observed them come and go, when supernova came in when, and trying to understand what was going on.

Jeff Hall:

These were the scientists of their day using the best information and best tools they had available to try to understand what was going one. And there were substantially wrong about a lot of it but then you also had so many brilliant deductions that when you get to Aristophanes and Euclid and all of these people who built the foundations of what we understand today.

Jeff Hall:

The ancient science is sort of an inspiration. They’re a reminder that it’s okay to pursue something you don’t understand. It’s okay to be wrong. If you form a hypothesis and it’s completely wrong, that’s not a failure. I think that’s a really important message to send to kids. It’s okay to experiment and find out it’s wrong. A result of wrong is often as valuable as the result of right because it tells us something about the world.

Jeff Hall:

So, yeah, we love talking about cultural astronomy and how both western astronomers as well as various different cultures from the local Native Americans to the Babylonians to everyone who’s interpreted the sky in different ways, they have good stories to tell.

Wayne Parker:

This is Wayne Parker having so much fun today, host of the StoriesHere Podcast, talking to Dr. Jeff Hall who’s the director of the Lowell Observatory. You’re an accomplished organist and you were previously on the board of Flagstaff Symphony. Is there a connection between music and astronomy?

Jeff Hall:

I think pretty deep, and again, that could be another very long conversation. But yeah, if I hadn’t gone into astronomy, I probably would have pursued a career as a concert organist. I’m decidedly and frustratingly rusty at this point. It would take a fair amount to bring back some of the stuff I used to be able to play. But just the nature of music and the propagation of sound is tightly tied to physics. And of course then, there is all the interesting physiology of how your brain processes sound emotionally and how it responds to music and tonal centers or music without tonal centers.

Jeff Hall:

And then there’s also just, I see a lot of connections between some of the music of the greatest composers like particularly Bach.

Jeff Hall:

It speaks to around origins. Bach’s contrapuntal music, he wrote so much in the genre of canons and fugues. These are pieces that are about themselves. And this is what we’re doing when we study astronomy. Ultimately, we’re trying to understand ourselves and I just see a really deep connection in how we understand ourselves through science as well as through art and in particular, the organization of sound. It’s always been a very fun pursuit for me and an interesting diversion from my day job.

Wayne Parker:

I so appreciate your time today.

Jeff Hall:

Yes, my pleasure.

Wayne Parker

Thank your for listening today.  Please share this episode with others, and contact us if you have any questions or suggestions.  My email is parker@storieshere.com.

 

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A conversation with Dr. Jeff Hall, Director - That Frequently Asked Question, ‘Where is God?’, is one of many the staff hears at the Lowell Observatory, especially during astronomy nights.  In this wide-ranging conversation with Lowell’s Director, A conversation with Dr. Jeff Hall, Director<br /> <br /> That Frequently Asked Question, ‘Where is God?’, is one of many the staff hears at the Lowell Observatory, especially during astronomy nights.  In this wide-ranging conversation with Lowell’s Director, Dr. Jeff Hall, we talk about everything from that to Venus and Mars, space debris, the connection between music and astronomy, and much, much more.<br /> <br /> The Lowell Observatory is a time machine, from its study of the origins of the universe, to a future of life on other planets, to the hurdles we may be putting up with so many spacecraft in the sky.  To learn more and support the observatory, go to Lowell.edu.<br /> <br /> And here’s a story about the total solar eclipse discussed in this episode.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Transcript<br /> <br /> Intro with music: Welcome to the StoriesHere Podcast<br /> <br /> Dr. Jeff Hall, Director, Lowell Observatory:<br /> <br /> I had several people come up to me literally in tears. They were so overwhelmed, particularly if they’ve never seen a total eclipse before. It’s a pretty amazing experience. And I think it’s that absolute wonder and awe of what we see when we look into the cosmos.<br /> <br /> Wayne Parker, Host, StoriesHere Podcast<br /> <br /> That’s Dr. Jeff Hall, director of the Lowell Observatory, talking about the 2017 total solar eclipse which he hosted on a live program with the Science Channel that was viewed by 1.6 million people. That group was gathered in Madras, Oregon on a high school football field and it was reported that after the eclipse passed, they cheered, “Do it again.”<br /> <br /> Wayne Parker:<br /> <br /> This is Wayne Parker, host of the StoriesHere Podcast. And on that day, I was about 100 miles to the west in Corvallis, Oregon and experienced totality about three minutes before it reached to Jeff’s Science Channel group. So at 10:18 that morning of August 21st, 2017, we stood in a public park and watched as the sun was totally blocked by the moon plunging our world into darkness. Streetlights came on, and it was truly one of those feelings were words can’t do justice.<br /> <br /> In addition to things like explaining eclipses on television, as the director of Lowell Observatory, Jeff helps lead a center that Time magazine named one of the world’s 100 most important places. Are you surprised that this place outside Flagstaff, Arizona, is on a list of the world’s most important places along the Great Wall of China and the Roman Colosseum?<br /> <br /> There are many more surprises in today’s StoriesHere episode. Thank you for joining us. I’m your host, Wayne Parker, our adviser is museum expert Alice Parman, and original music is by George Davidson.<br /> <br /> And did you know the Planet Pluto was discovered at Lowell? More on that to come. It’s also a major education center and has been called America’s observatory. So in their education role, I asked next about any visitor comments that Jeff particularly remembers.<br /> <br /> Jeff Hall:<br /> <br /> An email will land in my inbox from a mom somewhere and saying literally, you changed my kid’s life because of the experience they had here and the high opening of views they got and the exposure they got to astronomy and science. And knowing that we have positively impacted a young life and maybe inspired a scientist of the next generation, that’s amazingly satisfying and definitely part of why we do what we do.<br /> <br /> Wayne Parker:<br /> <br /> And how do you look at that bridge between the research and the outreach, because you have a big staff there, you have all these research going on and historically, Lowell is known for real breakthroughs, the discovery of Pluto, really crucial background in understanding the Big Bang. And yet, you do a great conjunction at Christmas last year. There were 75,000 people live paying attention to that and over two million views on YouTube. Jeff, Wayne Parker 48:03
Great Lakes Science Center https://storieshere.com/2021/05/great-lakes-science-center/ Mon, 24 May 2021 15:18:52 +0000 https://storieshere.com/?p=2306 This episode is an intriguing conversation with Dr. Kirsten Ellenbogen President & CEO at Great Lakes Science Center (GSLC), Cleveland, Ohio, United States, on Lake Erie. The Center has been named one of 15 museum finalists for the nation's highest honor for the field: the 2021 Institute for Museum & Library Service Medal. https://greatscience.com/great-lakes-science-cen Here's a bit more background on Dr. Ellenbogen....."As third President and CEO of Great Lakes Science Center, she has launched Cleveland Creates, a strategic initiative developed in collaboration with corporate leaders to change the community’s narrative around advanced manufacturing and technology for diverse middle-school youth and families. Great Lakes Science Center is a non-profit, educational institution that envisions a community where all people value science, technology, engineering, and math to inform decision-making and enrich lives. It is home to the NASA Glenn Visitor Center, the nationally recognized MC2 STEM High School (grade 9) and features hundreds of hands-on exhibits, daily demonstrations, and the OMNIMAX® Theater." And here's a short video introduction to the Center... https://youtu.be/NnDdmpIyYrU This episode is an intriguing conversation with Dr. Kirsten Ellenbogen President & CEO at Great Lakes Science Center (GSLC), Cleveland, Ohio, United States, on Lake Erie.

The Center has been named one of 15 museum finalists for the nation’s highest honor for the field: the 2021 Institute for Museum & Library Service Medal. https://greatscience.com/great-lakes-science-cen

Here’s a bit more background on Dr. Ellenbogen…..”As third President and CEO of Great Lakes Science Center, she has launched Cleveland Creates, a strategic initiative developed in collaboration with corporate leaders to change the community’s narrative around advanced manufacturing and technology for diverse middle-school youth and families. Great Lakes Science Center is a non-profit, educational institution that envisions a community where all people value science, technology, engineering, and math to inform decision-making and enrich lives. It is home to the NASA Glenn Visitor Center, the nationally recognized MC2 STEM High School (grade 9) and features hundreds of hands-on exhibits, daily demonstrations, and the OMNIMAX® Theater.”

And here’s a short video introduction to the Center…

https://youtu.be/NnDdmpIyYrU

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This episode is an intriguing conversation with Dr. Kirsten Ellenbogen President & CEO at Great Lakes Science Center (GSLC), Cleveland, Ohio, United States, on Lake Erie. - The Center has been named one of 15 museum finalists for the nation's highest ... This episode is an intriguing conversation with Dr. Kirsten Ellenbogen President & CEO at Great Lakes Science Center (GSLC), Cleveland, Ohio, United States, on Lake Erie.<br /> <br /> The Center has been named one of 15 museum finalists for the nation's highest honor for the field: the 2021 Institute for Museum & Library Service Medal. https://greatscience.com/great-lakes-science-cen<br /> <br /> Here's a bit more background on Dr. Ellenbogen....."As third President and CEO of Great Lakes Science Center, she has launched Cleveland Creates, a strategic initiative developed in collaboration with corporate leaders to change the community’s narrative around advanced manufacturing and technology for diverse middle-school youth and families. Great Lakes Science Center is a non-profit, educational institution that envisions a community where all people value science, technology, engineering, and math to inform decision-making and enrich lives. It is home to the NASA Glenn Visitor Center, the nationally recognized MC2 STEM High School (grade 9) and features hundreds of hands-on exhibits, daily demonstrations, and the OMNIMAX® Theater."<br /> <br /> And here's a short video introduction to the Center...<br /> <br /> https://youtu.be/NnDdmpIyYrU Wayne Parker 32 Great Lakes Science Center clean 29:57
Stories from the World’s Largest Children’s Museum (it’s for adults too!) https://storieshere.com/2021/03/stories-from-the-worlds-largest-childrens-museum-its-for-adults-too/ Mon, 22 Mar 2021 14:11:24 +0000 https://storieshere.com/?p=2296 The world's largest children's museum holds lots of stories.  Here's a fascinating conversation about many of them with Jennifer Pace Robinson, the Executive Vice President of The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. Did you know she's helped design children's museums all over the world?  Find out what that's like, and how children's museums are really for adults too. Thank you to our StoriesHere Advisor Alice Parman and Audio Engineer George Davidson. Hear more fascinating conversations with museum leaders in other StoriesHere episodes. The world’s largest children’s museum holds lots of stories.  Here’s a fascinating conversation about many of them with Jennifer Pace Robinson, the Executive Vice President of The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.

Did you know she’s helped design children’s museums all over the world?  Find out what that’s like, and how children’s museums are really for adults too.

Thank you to our StoriesHere Advisor Alice Parman and Audio Engineer George Davidson.

Hear more fascinating conversations with museum leaders in other StoriesHere episodes.

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The world's largest children's museum holds lots of stories.  Here's a fascinating conversation about many of them with Jennifer Pace Robinson, the Executive Vice President of The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. The world's largest children's museum holds lots of stories.  Here's a fascinating conversation about many of them with Jennifer Pace Robinson, the Executive Vice President of The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.<br /> Did you know she's helped design children's museums all over the world?  Find out what that's like, and how children's museums are really for adults too.<br /> Thank you to our StoriesHere Advisor Alice Parman and Audio Engineer George Davidson.<br /> <br /> Hear more fascinating conversations with museum leaders in other StoriesHere episodes. Wayne Parker 27:21
A History Museum. Just Way More Super. https://storieshere.com/2021/03/a-history-museum-just-way-more-super/ Mon, 08 Mar 2021 15:41:41 +0000 https://storieshere.com/?p=2283 Direct from the world’s only superhero and comic museum, this is a heroic conversation with Allen Stewart, Director and Founder of the Hall of Heroes – Superhero Museum in Elkhart, Indiana.  You'll appreciate Allen's insight and knowledge, along with some surprises, about the history of Superheroes. Superheroes are important in so many ways….discover how they've changed and why they've endured for so long. Learn more about the Museum at https://hallofheroesmuseum.com and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/hohmuseum/. StoriesHere is a volunteer project based in Eugene, Oregon created by people who think museums are important and fun.  Our mission is to highlight a variety of museums through conversations with their leaders. Special thanks to Alice Parman, Advisor, and George Davidson, Audio Engineer.  The host is Wayne Parker. Direct from the world’s only superhero and comic museum, this is a heroic conversation with Allen Stewart, Director and Founder of the Hall of Heroes – Superhero Museum in Elkhart, Indiana.  You’ll appreciate Allen’s insight and knowledge, along with some surprises, about the history of Superheroes.

Superheroes are important in so many ways….discover how they’ve changed and why they’ve endured for so long.

Learn more about the Museum at https://hallofheroesmuseum.com and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/hohmuseum/.


StoriesHere is a volunteer project based in Eugene, Oregon created by people who think museums are important and fun.  Our mission is to highlight a variety of museums through conversations with their leaders.

Special thanks to Alice Parman, Advisor, and George Davidson, Audio Engineer.  The host is Wayne Parker.

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Direct from the world’s only superhero and comic museum, this is a heroic conversation with Allen Stewart, Director and Founder of the Hall of Heroes – Superhero Museum in Elkhart, Indiana.  You'll appreciate Allen's insight and knowledge, Direct from the world’s only superhero and comic museum, this is a heroic conversation with Allen Stewart, Director and Founder of the Hall of Heroes – Superhero Museum in Elkhart, Indiana.  You'll appreciate Allen's insight and knowledge, along with some surprises, about the history of Superheroes.<br /> <br /> Superheroes are important in so many ways….discover how they've changed and why they've endured for so long.<br /> <br /> Learn more about the Museum at https://hallofheroesmuseum.com and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/hohmuseum/.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> StoriesHere is a volunteer project based in Eugene, Oregon created by people who think museums are important and fun.  Our mission is to highlight a variety of museums through conversations with their leaders.<br /> <br /> Special thanks to Alice Parman, Advisor, and George Davidson, Audio Engineer.  The host is Wayne Parker. Wayne Parker 27:21
Museum Of Bad Art https://storieshere.com/2021/02/museum-of-bad-art/ Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:41:14 +0000 https://storieshere.com/?p=2261 Here’s a surprising, funny and important conversation with Louise Reilly Sacco, Permanent Acting Interim Executive Director, Museum Of Bad Art in Boston, MA, US. Website: museumofbadart.org and Facebook:  Museum of Bad Art. MOBA – Museum Of Bad Art – ‘art too bad to be ignored’.  The world’s only museum dedicated to the collection, preservation, exhibition and celebration of bad art in all its forms.  Our growing collection of works of Bad Art awaits your discerning eye. The World’s Ten Most Unusual Museums You Should Visit – The Culture Trip Only Top TEN?  A newspaper in New Delhi says it’s one of the world’s SIX must-see museums. You won’t want to miss this surprising conversation with Louise, and tell your friends! ‘Sunday on the Pot With George’ – John Gedraitis Click here for CBS feature of this painting ‘Lucy in the Field with Flowers’ – Anonymous Here’s a surprising, funny and important conversation with Louise Reilly Sacco, Permanent Acting Interim Executive Director, Museum Of Bad Art in Boston, MA, US.

Website: museumofbadart.org and Facebook:  Museum of Bad Art.

MOBA – Museum Of Bad Art – ‘art too bad to be ignored’.  The world’s only museum dedicated to the collection, preservation, exhibition and celebration of bad art in all its forms.  Our growing collection of works of Bad Art awaits your discerning eye.

The World’s Ten Most Unusual Museums You Should Visit – The Culture Trip

Only Top TEN?  A newspaper in New Delhi says it’s one of the world’s SIX must-see museums.

You won’t want to miss this surprising conversation with Louise, and tell your friends!

‘Sunday on the Pot With George’ – John Gedraitis

Click here for CBS feature of this painting

‘Lucy in the Field with Flowers’ – Anonymous

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Here’s a surprising, funny and important conversation with Louise Reilly Sacco, Permanent Acting Interim Executive Director, Museum Of Bad Art in Boston, MA, US. - Website: museumofbadart.org and Facebook:  Museum of Bad Art. - Here’s a surprising, funny and important conversation with Louise Reilly Sacco, Permanent Acting Interim Executive Director, Museum Of Bad Art in Boston, MA, US.<br /> <br /> Website: museumofbadart.org and Facebook:  Museum of Bad Art.<br /> <br /> MOBA – Museum Of Bad Art – ‘art too bad to be ignored’.  The world’s only museum dedicated to the collection, preservation, exhibition and celebration of bad art in all its forms.  Our growing collection of works of Bad Art awaits your discerning eye.<br /> <br /> The World’s Ten Most Unusual Museums You Should Visit – The Culture Trip<br /> <br /> Only Top TEN?  A newspaper in New Delhi says it’s one of the world’s SIX must-see museums.<br /> <br /> You won’t want to miss this surprising conversation with Louise, and tell your friends!<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> ‘Sunday on the Pot With George’ – John Gedraitis<br /> <br /> Click here for CBS feature of this painting<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> ‘Lucy in the Field with Flowers’ – Anonymous Wayne Parker clean 26:29
“Everything is new, everything is magical” https://storieshere.com/2021/02/everything-is-new-everything-is-magical/ Mon, 08 Feb 2021 02:11:41 +0000 https://storieshere.com/?p=2206 Today's episode is part of Museum Mondays, a conversation with Jane Turner of the Children's Museum of Atlanta.  The title is a comment of hers about how children see the world. Jane is the Executive Director, Children’s Museum of Atlanta, 275 Centennial Olympic Park Dr., Atlanta, GA  30313, Phone (404) 659-5437 - Website: childrensmuseumatlanta.org Here is a comment from the Museum about play... Play is freedom. Play is creativity. Play is important. Children’s Museum of Atlanta empowers kids to “create their own learning adventures” and be free to play. Thank you to Julia Clinch, Brave Public Relations for the help in arranging this episode.  The podcast Host is Wayne Parker, Advisor is Alice Parman and Audio Editor is George Davidson. For more information on children's museums, contact the Association of Children's Museums at https://www.childrensmuseums.org/         Today’s episode is part of Museum Mondays, a conversation with Jane Turner of the Children’s Museum of Atlanta.  The title is a comment of hers about how children see the world.

Jane is the Executive Director, Children’s Museum of Atlanta, 275 Centennial Olympic Park Dr., Atlanta, GA  30313, Phone (404) 659-5437 – Website: childrensmuseumatlanta.org

Here is a comment from the Museum about play…

Play is freedom. Play is creativity. Play is important. Children’s Museum of Atlanta empowers kids to “create their own learning adventures” and be free to play.

Thank you to Julia Clinch, Brave Public Relations for the help in arranging this episode.  The podcast Host is Wayne Parker, Advisor is Alice Parman and Audio Editor is George Davidson.

For more information on children’s museums, contact the Association of Children’s Museums at https://www.childrensmuseums.org/


 

 

 

 

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Today's episode is part of Museum Mondays, a conversation with Jane Turner of the Children's Museum of Atlanta.  The title is a comment of hers about how children see the world. Jane is the Executive Director, Children’s Museum of Atlanta, Today's episode is part of Museum Mondays, a conversation with Jane Turner of the Children's Museum of Atlanta.  The title is a comment of hers about how children see the world.<br /> Jane is the Executive Director, Children’s Museum of Atlanta, 275 Centennial Olympic Park Dr., Atlanta, GA  30313, Phone (404) 659-5437 - Website: childrensmuseumatlanta.org<br /> <br /> Here is a comment from the Museum about play...<br /> <br /> Play is freedom. Play is creativity. Play is important. Children’s Museum of Atlanta empowers kids to “create their own learning adventures” and be free to play.<br /> <br /> <br /> Thank you to Julia Clinch, Brave Public Relations for the help in arranging this episode.  The podcast Host is Wayne Parker, Advisor is Alice Parman and Audio Editor is George Davidson.<br /> For more information on children's museums, contact the Association of Children's Museums at https://www.childrensmuseums.org/<br /> <br /> <br /> <br />  <br /> <br />  <br /> <br />  <br /> <br />   Wayne Parker 29:10
‘The Future of Museums’ with Elizabeth Merritt https://storieshere.com/2021/01/the-future-of-museums/ Mon, 25 Jan 2021 10:42:23 +0000 https://storieshere.com/?p=2171 With museums facing so many challenges, and opportunities, what a great time to talk with Elizabeth Merritt.  She is the Vice President for Strategic Foresight and Founding Director of the Center for the Future of Museums at the American Alliance of Museums.   We're excited with this episode to launch Museum Mondays, and will have a new StoriesHere episode coming to you every other Monday.  For reminders of each episode, please sign up here, or with your favorite podcast player. Host: Wayne Parker; Advisor: Alice Parman; Audio Editor:  George Davidson Show Notes American Alliance of Museums www.aam-us.org on Twitter @aamers Center for the Future of Museums www.aam-us.org/programs/center-for-the-future-of-museums/ on Twitter @futureofmuseums Subscribe to CFM’s free weekly e-newsletter Dispatches from the Future of Museums  bit.ly/dispatchesfromthefuture The Umbrella Cover Museum: https://www.umbrellacovermuseum.org/ Woodlawn Plantation https://savingplaces.org/places/woodlawn#.X_84JBZ7mUl and it’s work with Arcadia Center for Sustainable Food and Agriculture http://arcadiafood.org/ And a blog post from Woodlawn’s director about this work: https://www.aam-us.org/2011/02/01/saving-the-historic-house-while-saving-the-world/ Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch program https://www.montereybayaquarium.org/newsroom/media-kits/sfw-introduction-and-mission Museum of Tomorrow, Sao Paulo, Brazil https://museudoamanha.org.br/en Blog posts about their AI chatbot IRIS+ : https://www.aam-us.org/2018/06/12/iris-part-one-designing-coding-a-museum-ai/ https://www.aam-us.org/2018/06/19/iris-part-two-how-to-embed-a-museums-personality-and-values-in-ai/ Facts about America’s Museums https://www.aam-us.org/programs/about-museums/ The Dunkleosteus fossil at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History that made Elizabeth pee her pants as a toddler https://www.cmnh.org/dunk   With museums facing so many challenges, and opportunities, what a great time to talk with Elizabeth Merritt.  She is the Vice President for Strategic Foresight and Founding Director of the Center for the Future of Museums at the American Alliance of Museums.  

We’re excited with this episode to launch Museum Mondays, and will have a new StoriesHere episode coming to you every other Monday.  For reminders of each episode, please sign up here, or with your favorite podcast player.

Host: Wayne Parker; Advisor: Alice Parman; Audio Editor:  George Davidson

Show Notes

American Alliance of Museums www.aam-us.org on Twitter @aamers

Center for the Future of Museums www.aam-us.org/programs/center-for-the-future-of-museums/ on Twitter @futureofmuseums

Subscribe to CFM’s free weekly e-newsletter Dispatches from the Future of Museums  bit.ly/dispatchesfromthefuture

The Umbrella Cover Museum: https://www.umbrellacovermuseum.org/

Woodlawn Plantation https://savingplaces.org/places/woodlawn#.X_84JBZ7mUl and it’s work with Arcadia Center for Sustainable Food and Agriculture http://arcadiafood.org/

And a blog post from Woodlawn’s director about this work: https://www.aam-us.org/2011/02/01/saving-the-historic-house-while-saving-the-world/

Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch program https://www.montereybayaquarium.org/newsroom/media-kits/sfw-introduction-and-mission

Museum of Tomorrow, Sao Paulo, Brazil https://museudoamanha.org.br/en

Blog posts about their AI chatbot IRIS+ :

https://www.aam-us.org/2018/06/12/iris-part-one-designing-coding-a-museum-ai/

https://www.aam-us.org/2018/06/19/iris-part-two-how-to-embed-a-museums-personality-and-values-in-ai/

Facts about America’s Museums

https://www.aam-us.org/programs/about-museums/

The Dunkleosteus fossil at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History that made Elizabeth pee her pants as a toddler

https://www.cmnh.org/dunk

 

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With museums facing so many challenges, and opportunities, what a great time to talk with Elizabeth Merritt.  She is the Vice President for Strategic Foresight and Founding Director of the Center for the Future of Museums at the American Alliance of Mu... With museums facing so many challenges, and opportunities, what a great time to talk with Elizabeth Merritt.  She is the Vice President for Strategic Foresight and Founding Director of the Center for the Future of Museums at the American Alliance of Museums.  <br /> <br /> We're excited with this episode to launch Museum Mondays, and will have a new StoriesHere episode coming to you every other Monday.  For reminders of each episode, please sign up here, or with your favorite podcast player.<br /> <br /> Host: Wayne Parker; Advisor: Alice Parman; Audio Editor:  George Davidson<br /> <br /> Show Notes<br /> <br /> American Alliance of Museums www.aam-us.org on Twitter @aamers<br /> <br /> Center for the Future of Museums www.aam-us.org/programs/center-for-the-future-of-museums/ on Twitter @futureofmuseums<br /> <br /> Subscribe to CFM’s free weekly e-newsletter Dispatches from the Future of Museums  bit.ly/dispatchesfromthefuture<br /> <br /> The Umbrella Cover Museum: https://www.umbrellacovermuseum.org/<br /> <br /> Woodlawn Plantation https://savingplaces.org/places/woodlawn#.X_84JBZ7mUl and it’s work with Arcadia Center for Sustainable Food and Agriculture http://arcadiafood.org/<br /> <br /> And a blog post from Woodlawn’s director about this work: https://www.aam-us.org/2011/02/01/saving-the-historic-house-while-saving-the-world/<br /> <br /> Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch program https://www.montereybayaquarium.org/newsroom/media-kits/sfw-introduction-and-mission<br /> <br /> Museum of Tomorrow, Sao Paulo, Brazil https://museudoamanha.org.br/en<br /> <br /> Blog posts about their AI chatbot IRIS+ :<br /> <br /> https://www.aam-us.org/2018/06/12/iris-part-one-designing-coding-a-museum-ai/<br /> <br /> https://www.aam-us.org/2018/06/19/iris-part-two-how-to-embed-a-museums-personality-and-values-in-ai/<br /> <br /> Facts about America’s Museums<br /> <br /> https://www.aam-us.org/programs/about-museums/<br /> <br /> The Dunkleosteus fossil at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History that made Elizabeth pee her pants as a toddler<br /> <br /> https://www.cmnh.org/dunk<br /> <br />   Wayne Parker 46:36
A Young Woman’s Hope – The Origins of Fernbank Museum https://storieshere.com/2020/11/the-audacity-of-hope-fernbank-museum/ Mon, 30 Nov 2020 22:12:50 +0000 https://storieshere.com/?p=2120 This StoriesHere episode features a conversation with Jennifer Grant Warner, President and CEO of Fernbank Museum of Natural History in Atlanta, Georgia.  Stories range from the very different experience of being in an old growth forest, to how to pronounce Argentinosaurus (I failed).  Below is a little background from their website on why the title refers to ‘The Audacity of Hope’.  Then join our conversation to learn about this place in Atlanta ‘Where Science, Nature and Fun Make History’! "In the late 1800’s a young woman named Emily Harrison played in one of Atlanta, Georgia’s woodlands. Later in life, she would help preserve 65 acres of land that she played on, which she called “Fernbank.”  As Atlanta grew and became more urbanized, woodlands were disappearing.  In 1939, with the assistance of other “conservation‐minded environmentalists,” she purchased Fernbank Forest with its creek and forest of ferns.    Fernbank Museum of Natural History may be the only natural history museum to ‘grow’ out of the forest.  The museum opened in 1992, and in 2001 the museum became the first to display the world’s largest dinosaurs as a part of their permanent exhibition." This StoriesHere episode features a conversation with Jennifer Grant Warner, President and CEO of Fernbank Museum of Natural History in Atlanta, Georgia.  Stories range from the very different experience of being in an old growth forest, to how to pronounce Argentinosaurus (I failed). 

Below is a little background from their website on why the title refers to ‘The Audacity of Hope’.  Then join our conversation to learn about this place in Atlanta ‘Where Science, Nature and Fun Make History’!

“In the late 1800’s a young woman named Emily Harrison played in one of Atlanta, Georgia’s woodlands. Later in life, she would help preserve 65 acres of land that she played on, which she called “Fernbank.”  As Atlanta grew and became more urbanized, woodlands were disappearing.  In 1939, with the assistance of other “conservation‐minded environmentalists,” she purchased Fernbank Forest with its creek and forest of ferns.   

Fernbank Museum of Natural History may be the only natural history museum to ‘grow’ out of the forest.  The museum opened in 1992, and in 2001 the museum became the first to display the world’s largest dinosaurs as a part of their permanent exhibition.”

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This StoriesHere episode features a conversation with Jennifer Grant Warner, President and CEO of Fernbank Museum of Natural History in Atlanta, Georgia.  Stories range from the very different experience of being in an old growth forest, This StoriesHere episode features a conversation with Jennifer Grant Warner, President and CEO of Fernbank Museum of Natural History in Atlanta, Georgia.  Stories range from the very different experience of being in an old growth forest, to how to pronounce Argentinosaurus (I failed). <br /> Below is a little background from their website on why the title refers to ‘The Audacity of Hope’.  Then join our conversation to learn about this place in Atlanta ‘Where Science, Nature and Fun Make History’!<br /> "In the late 1800’s a young woman named Emily Harrison played in one of Atlanta, Georgia’s woodlands. Later in life, she would help preserve 65 acres of land that she played on, which she called “Fernbank.”  As Atlanta grew and became more urbanized, woodlands were disappearing.  In 1939, with the assistance of other “conservation‐minded environmentalists,” she purchased Fernbank Forest with its creek and forest of ferns.   <br /> Fernbank Museum of Natural History may be the only natural history museum to ‘grow’ out of the forest.  The museum opened in 1992, and in 2001 the museum became the first to display the world’s largest dinosaurs as a part of their permanent exhibition." Wayne Parker 35:59
A Gem in Tulsa https://storieshere.com/2020/08/a-gem-in-tulsa/ Fri, 21 Aug 2020 21:54:48 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?p=1896 This conversation is with Laura Fry, Senior Curator and Curator of Art for the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma.  The discussion includes topics from "Did the Supreme Court really give eastern Oklahoma back to the native Americans?".....to what kids can teach us about art, the role painter Thomas Moran played in establishing our national park system, and the rare opportunity to plan a completely new museum. And how a museum with the largest collection of American western art is a bit of a hidden gem.  Perhaps that will be changing with the construction and opening of an expansive new building. And more about the Museum from their web site...."Thomas Gilcrease, a citizen of the Muscogee Creek Nation, established Gilcrease Museum in 1949 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Today the interdisciplinary collection contains more than 350,000 items. The museum represents hundreds of Indigenous cultures from across North and South America, with material culture and archaeology ranging from 12,000 BCE to the 21st century. The collection includes more than 350 years of American paintings, sculptures and works on paper, including the largest public holdings of art of the American West." This conversation is with Laura Fry, Senior Curator and Curator of Art for the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma.  The discussion includes topics from “Did the Supreme Court really give eastern Oklahoma back to the native Americans?”…..to what kids can teach us about art, the role painter Thomas Moran played in establishing our national park system, and the rare opportunity to plan a completely new museum.

And how a museum with the largest collection of American western art is a bit of a hidden gem.  Perhaps that will be changing with the construction and opening of an expansive new building.

And more about the Museum from their web site….”Thomas Gilcrease, a citizen of the Muscogee Creek Nation, established Gilcrease Museum in 1949 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Today the interdisciplinary collection contains more than 350,000 items. The museum represents hundreds of Indigenous cultures from across North and South America, with material culture and archaeology ranging from 12,000 BCE to the 21st century. The collection includes more than 350 years of American paintings, sculptures and works on paper, including the largest public holdings of art of the American West.”

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This conversation is with Laura Fry, Senior Curator and Curator of Art for the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma.  The discussion includes topics from "Did the Supreme Court really give eastern Oklahoma back to the native Americans?"..... This conversation is with Laura Fry, Senior Curator and Curator of Art for the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma.  The discussion includes topics from "Did the Supreme Court really give eastern Oklahoma back to the native Americans?".....to what kids can teach us about art, the role painter Thomas Moran played in establishing our national park system, and the rare opportunity to plan a completely new museum.<br /> <br /> And how a museum with the largest collection of American western art is a bit of a hidden gem.  Perhaps that will be changing with the construction and opening of an expansive new building.<br /> <br /> And more about the Museum from their web site...."Thomas Gilcrease, a citizen of the Muscogee Creek Nation, established Gilcrease Museum in 1949 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Today the interdisciplinary collection contains more than 350,000 items. The museum represents hundreds of Indigenous cultures from across North and South America, with material culture and archaeology ranging from 12,000 BCE to the 21st century. The collection includes more than 350 years of American paintings, sculptures and works on paper, including the largest public holdings of art of the American West." Wayne Parker 39:43
National Nordic Museum – Part 2 https://storieshere.com/2020/06/national-nordic-museum-part-2/ Mon, 01 Jun 2020 00:00:58 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?p=1839 Greetings, Wayne Parker here, with a conversation about Nordic culture, which is today more important than ever. And we’ll get to that, and some intriguing stories in a moment. First, some of you may be wondering, are Nordic countries the same as Scandinavian ones? For the answer we’ll go to Eric Nelson, CEO and Executive Director of the National Nordic Museum in Seattle, who was the 2019 Swedish American of the Year. And previously Eric was recognized as a Knight of the Order of the White Rose of Finland by the President of the country himself. We have many more questions for Eric. This is the StoriesHere podcast, which exists because museums hold some of our most important, and interesting, stories. We talk with people who know those stories best, leaders from museums around the country. Our episodes have included stories of science and nature, and cultures such as Latino, African American, Jewish and more. Greetings, Wayne Parker here, with a conversation about Nordic culture, which is today more important than ever. And we’ll get to that, and some intriguing stories in a moment. First, some of you may be wondering, are Nordic countries the same as Scandinavian ones? For the answer we’ll go to Eric Nelson, CEO and Executive Director of the National Nordic Museum in Seattle, who was the 2019 Swedish American of the Year. And previously Eric was recognized as a Knight of the Order of the White Rose of Finland by the President of the country himself. We have many more questions for Eric. This is the StoriesHere podcast, which exists because museums hold some of our most important, and interesting, stories. We talk with people who know those stories best, leaders from museums around the country. Our episodes have included stories of science and nature, and cultures such as Latino, African American, Jewish and more.

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Greetings, Wayne Parker here, with a conversation about Nordic culture, which is today more important than ever. And we’ll get to that, and some intriguing stories in a moment. First, some of you may be wondering, Greetings, Wayne Parker here, with a conversation about Nordic culture, which is today more important than ever. And we’ll get to that, and some intriguing stories in a moment. First, some of you may be wondering, are Nordic countries the same as Scandinavian ones? For the answer we’ll go to Eric Nelson, CEO and Executive Director of the National Nordic Museum in Seattle, who was the 2019 Swedish American of the Year. And previously Eric was recognized as a Knight of the Order of the White Rose of Finland by the President of the country himself. We have many more questions for Eric. This is the StoriesHere podcast, which exists because museums hold some of our most important, and interesting, stories. We talk with people who know those stories best, leaders from museums around the country. Our episodes have included stories of science and nature, and cultures such as Latino, African American, Jewish and more. Wayne Parker 27:35
National Nordic Museum – Part 1 https://storieshere.com/2020/06/national-nordic-museum-part-1/ Mon, 01 Jun 2020 00:00:17 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?p=1842 This episode is a conversation with Leslie Anderson, the Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs for the spectacular National Nordic Museum in Seattle. Leslie was a Fulbright scholar and worked at the National Gallery of Denmark. In this episode she talks about the importance of oral history, stories of the Sami people, and why museums collect. There is much to learn about what Nordic culture can teach us about today’s challenges. This episode is a conversation with Leslie Anderson, the Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs for the spectacular National Nordic Museum in Seattle. Leslie was a Fulbright scholar and worked at the National Gallery of Denmark. This episode is a conversation with Leslie Anderson, the Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs for the spectacular National Nordic Museum in Seattle. Leslie was a Fulbright scholar and worked at the National Gallery of Denmark. In this episode she talks about the importance of oral history, stories of the Sami people, and why museums collect. There is much to learn about what Nordic culture can teach us about today’s challenges. Wayne Parker 26:01 The Center of the Computer Revolution https://storieshere.com/2020/03/the-center-of-the-computer-revolution/ Wed, 04 Mar 2020 00:00:47 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?p=1847 Some remarkable stories from this conversation with Dan'l Lewin, a leader of the computer revolution. This episode ranges from Steve Jobs to professional wrestling to art, and the story and promise of the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California. This episode is also featured in Jonny Evans' wonderful article in Computer World. Transcript StoriesHere Podcast Conversation with Dan’l Lewin, President and CEO of the Computer History Museum Parker: This is Wayne Parker of StoriesHere, and today’s episode is a remarkable conversation with the President and CEO of the Computer History Museum, in the heart of Silicon Valley. That’s Dan’l Lewin, and Dan’l is spelled d a n ‘ l. We’ll start with my question about the late Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple Computer, who was such a legend and an enigma to many people. And Dan’l knew him about as well as anyone, both professionally and personally. So I asked if Dan’l could sit down on the porch with him for a talk, what would that be like, what questions did he think they might ask each other? You knew the late Steve Jobs professionally and personally about as well as anyone. If you could sit down with him on the porch for a talk, what would that be about, what questions do you think you might ask each other? Lewin: I think Steve would probably be focused very very intently on putting the control back in the person's hands. And right now some of the business models that have emerged have really relegated the individual to the product and I think he would have some sense of responsibility. It's trying to put that promise back in the system. That's what I would think and I would want to talk to him about that. Parker: That’s Dan’l Lewin, computer pioneer and now President and CEO of the Computer History Museum. Hello, this is Wayne Parker of the StoriesHere Podcast. And we’re speaking with him remotely at his office at the museum, in Mountain View, California in the heart of Silicon Valley. And Dan’l, that’s spilled D A N ' L ,was a leader at Apple, co-founder with Steve Jobs of NeXT, and later head of the Microsoft presence in Silicon Valley, along with a number of other roles. And there are three related trivia questions in this episode. I put Dan’l on the spot and he got all of them right, so you can hear the answers from him a little later. Here are the questions: - What was the name of the first personal computer? - When was it first sold, and - Where was Microsoft founded (hint: it wasn’t in the Seattle area) Let's get to this wonderful conversation. Dan’l, thanks for being with us today. Lewin: Glad to be here. Parker: So your background, for people that don't know, you were at Sony and Apple and you were at NeXT and Microsoft. Could you tell us about how you got to Apple and then how you got to NeXT from there? Lewin: Sure glad to again Wayne. Thanks for having me. Well as you mentioned I worked initially, it's Sony I was coming out of. College in 1976 in the very early part of 1977 went to work for Sony at a small office in Cupertino, California, which everything South of San Francisco down to Monterey Bay Area and it was the beginning of would consider the microprocessor Revolution which evolved very rapidly into the personal computer the irony of. Taking that job which came about through serendipity and her college roommate. Was that a week after I started the two Steve's jobs and Wozniak left the garage and rented the office space next to my little 600 square foot office where there were were five people and within about a year of joining that office. I was running the office and looking after what is the core of Silicon Valley and then again from South San Francisco down to Monterey. Long story short there is most people know Steve Jobs was very keen on design. And in those days in particular Sony was the definitive us Japanese company in terms of consumer electronics as a result of design and they charged a premium bas... Some remarkable stories from this conversation with Dan'l Lewin, a leader of the computer revolution. This episode ranges from Steve Jobs to professional wrestling to art, and the story and promise of the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, Some remarkable stories from this conversation with Dan'l Lewin, a leader of the computer revolution. This episode ranges from Steve Jobs to professional wrestling to art, and the story and promise of the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California.<br /> <br /> This episode is also featured in Jonny Evans' wonderful article in Computer World.<br /> <br /> Transcript<br /> StoriesHere Podcast Conversation with Dan’l Lewin, President and CEO of the Computer History Museum<br /> <br /> Parker: This is Wayne Parker of StoriesHere, and today’s episode is a remarkable conversation with the President and CEO of the Computer History Museum, in the heart of Silicon Valley. That’s Dan’l Lewin, and Dan’l is spelled d a n ‘ l. We’ll start with my question about the late Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple Computer, who was such a legend and an enigma to many people. And Dan’l knew him about as well as anyone, both professionally and personally. So I asked if Dan’l could sit down on the porch with him for a talk, what would that be like, what questions did he think they might ask each other?<br /> <br /> You knew the late Steve Jobs professionally and personally about as well as anyone. If you could sit down with him on the porch for a talk, what would that be about, what questions do you think you might ask each other?<br /> <br /> Lewin:<br /> I think Steve would probably be focused very very intently on putting the control back in the person's hands. And right now some of the business models that have emerged have really relegated the individual to the product and I think he would have some sense of responsibility. It's trying to put that promise back in the system. That's what I would think and I would want to talk to him about that.<br /> <br /> Parker:<br /> That’s Dan’l Lewin, computer pioneer and now President and CEO of the Computer History Museum. Hello, this is Wayne Parker of the StoriesHere Podcast. And we’re speaking with him remotely at his office at the museum, in Mountain View, California in the heart of Silicon Valley. And Dan’l, that’s spilled D A N ' L ,was a leader at Apple, co-founder with Steve Jobs of NeXT, and later head of the Microsoft presence in Silicon Valley, along with a number of other roles.<br /> <br /> And there are three related trivia questions in this episode. I put Dan’l on the spot and he got all of them right, so you can hear the answers from him a little later.<br /> <br /> Here are the questions:<br /> - What was the name of the first personal computer?<br /> - When was it first sold, and<br /> - Where was Microsoft founded (hint: it wasn’t in the Seattle area)<br /> <br /> Let's get to this wonderful conversation.<br /> Dan’l, thanks for being with us today.<br /> <br /> Lewin: Glad to be here.<br /> <br /> Parker:<br /> So your background, for people that don't know, you were at Sony and Apple and you were at NeXT and Microsoft. Could you tell us about how you got to Apple and then how you got to NeXT from there?<br /> <br /> Lewin:<br /> Sure glad to again Wayne. Thanks for having me. Well as you mentioned I worked initially, it's Sony I was coming out of. College in 1976 in the very early part of 1977 went to work for Sony at a small office in Cupertino, California, which everything South of San Francisco down to Monterey Bay Area and it was the beginning of would consider the microprocessor Revolution which evolved very rapidly into the personal computer the irony of.<br /> Taking that job which came about through serendipity and her college roommate. Was that a week after I started the two Steve's jobs and Wozniak left the garage and rented the office space next to my little 600 square foot office where there were were five people and within about a year of joining that office.<br /> I was running the office and looking after what is the core of Silicon Valley and then again from South San Francisco down to Monterey. Wayne Parker 44:31 Stories from the Oregon Jewish Museum https://storieshere.com/2020/03/stories-from-the-oregon-jewish-museum/ Mon, 02 Mar 2020 00:00:04 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?p=1844 This episode is an important and fascinating conversation with Judith Margles, Director of the Oregon Jewish Museum. OJMCHE In June 2017 Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education opened the doors of our permanent home at 724 NW Davis Street, on the North Park Blocks in downtown Portland. The museum’s main gallery features rotating exhibitions of national and international stature. Three core exhibits anchor the museum: Discrimination and Resistance, An Oregon Primer, which identifies discrimination as a tool used to affect varied groups of people over the history of this region; The Holocaust, An Oregon Perspective, a history of the Holocaust that employs the stories of Oregon survivors; and Oregon Jewish Stories, an installation focused on the experience of the Jews of Oregon. The museum also features a robust series of public programming including films, lectures, musical events, and programs in support of exhibitions. In addition, OJMCHE has a museum shop, a café, and a children’s play area. OREGON HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL The Oregon Holocaust Memorial situated in Portland’s Washington Park is free and open to the public from dawn until dark every day of the year and is ADA-accessible. The Memorial serves as a permanent reminder of the Holocaust, the systematic, bureaucratic, state-sponsored persecution and murder of six million Jews and millions of others by the Nazi regime and its collaborators from 1933 to 1945. By teaching the lessons of the Holocaust and visiting the Memorial, we pay homage to those who lost their lives during that period. This is Wayne Parker, having an important conversation today remotely with Judy Margles, who is in her office in Portland, Oregon, where she is Director of the Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education. The Museum tells the important stories of many oppressed peoples, and she’s going to start today with one about African Americans in Oregon. This episode is an important and fascinating conversation with Judith Margles, Director of the Oregon Jewish Museum. - OJMCHE In June 2017 Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education opened the doors of our permanent home at 724 NW Davis ... This episode is an important and fascinating conversation with Judith Margles, Director of the Oregon Jewish Museum.<br /> <br /> OJMCHE<br /> In June 2017 Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education opened the doors of our permanent home at 724 NW Davis Street, on the North Park Blocks in downtown Portland. The museum’s main gallery features rotating exhibitions of national and international stature. Three core exhibits anchor the museum: Discrimination and Resistance, An Oregon Primer, which identifies discrimination as a tool used to affect varied groups of people over the history of this region; The Holocaust, An Oregon Perspective, a history of the Holocaust that employs the stories of Oregon survivors; and Oregon Jewish Stories, an installation focused on the experience of the Jews of Oregon. The museum also features a robust series of public programming including films, lectures, musical events, and programs in support of exhibitions. In addition, OJMCHE has a museum shop, a café, and a children’s play area.<br /> <br /> OREGON HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL<br /> The Oregon Holocaust Memorial situated in Portland’s Washington Park is free and open to the public from dawn until dark every day of the year and is ADA-accessible. The Memorial serves as a permanent reminder of the Holocaust, the systematic, bureaucratic, state-sponsored persecution and murder of six million Jews and millions of others by the Nazi regime and its collaborators from 1933 to 1945. By teaching the lessons of the Holocaust and visiting the Memorial, we pay homage to those who lost their lives during that period.<br /> <br /> This is Wayne Parker, having an important conversation today remotely with Judy Margles, who is in her office in Portland, Oregon, where she is Director of the Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education.<br /> The Museum tells the important stories of many oppressed peoples, and she’s going to start today with one about African Americans in Oregon. Wayne Parker 26:15 Heritage Museum of Orange County https://storieshere.com/2020/01/heritage-museum-of-orange-county/ Sat, 11 Jan 2020 00:00:04 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?p=1850 This episode is an important conversation with Kevin Cabrera, Executive Director of the Heritage Museum of Orange County. Learn more at their website at https://heritagemuseumoc.org/. Heritage Museum of Orange County is home to the H.Clay Kellogg House and John Maag Farmhouse. Heritage Museum of OC is dedicated to preserving, promoting and restoring the heritage of Orange County and surrounding region through Hands-on, Minds-on interactive education. Heritage Museum of Orange County… Is a cultural and natural history center in Southern California. The centerpiece of the museum, which covers nearly 12 acres in all, is a historic plaza featuring several buildings from the 1890s set amid extensive floral gardens and citrus groves. Among the buildings is the Kellogg House familiar to teachers and students throughout Orange County as a favorite field trip destination for over 30 years. Recent additions to the museum include our Gospel Swamp Farm and the restoration of our Blacksmith Shop. The farm project is maintained by local high school and college volunteers. We’re currently installing a “Borrowing Barn” for tool lending and we utilize produce from the farm for our children’s educational programs and other museum events. Previously on site there was a fully operational blacksmith shop that was headquarters for the Orange County Blacksmith Guild and guild members held regular blacksmith classes. Unfortunately, the shop burned down in the wee hours of July 4, 2019 and it is now necessary to rebuild the shop. Demonstrations are still being provided for our educational programs, however no definitive schedule has been assigned for the completion of the rebuild. The latest major campaign for the museum is to restore the John A. Maag Farmhouse. The home, built in 1899, features three stories in 5,600 square feet of interior living space and is planned for the housing of museum archives, offices and exhibitions. Two original outbuildings of the Maag Farmhouse currently house offices, meeting space and our gift shop. This episode is an important conversation with Kevin Cabrera, Executive Director of the Heritage Museum of Orange County. Learn more at their website at https://heritagemuseumoc.org/. - Heritage Museum of Orange County is home to the H. This episode is an important conversation with Kevin Cabrera, Executive Director of the Heritage Museum of Orange County. Learn more at their website at https://heritagemuseumoc.org/.<br /> <br /> Heritage Museum of Orange County is home to the H.Clay Kellogg House and John Maag Farmhouse. Heritage Museum of OC is dedicated to preserving, promoting and restoring the heritage of Orange County and surrounding region through Hands-on, Minds-on interactive education.<br /> <br /> Heritage Museum of Orange County…<br /> Is a cultural and natural history center in Southern California. The centerpiece of the museum, which covers nearly 12 acres in all, is a historic plaza featuring several buildings from the 1890s set amid extensive floral gardens and citrus groves. Among the buildings is the Kellogg House familiar to teachers and students throughout Orange County as a favorite field trip destination for over 30 years.<br /> <br /> Recent additions to the museum include our Gospel Swamp Farm and the restoration of our Blacksmith Shop. The farm project is maintained by local high school and college volunteers. We’re currently installing a “Borrowing Barn” for tool lending and we utilize produce from the farm for our children’s educational programs and other museum events. Previously on site there was a fully operational blacksmith shop that was headquarters for the Orange County Blacksmith Guild and guild members held regular blacksmith classes. Unfortunately, the shop burned down in the wee hours of July 4, 2019 and it is now necessary to rebuild the shop. Demonstrations are still being provided for our educational programs, however no definitive schedule has been assigned for the completion of the rebuild.<br /> <br /> The latest major campaign for the museum is to restore the John A. Maag Farmhouse. The home, built in 1899, features three stories in 5,600 square feet of interior living space and is planned for the housing of museum archives, offices and exhibitions. Two original outbuildings of the Maag Farmhouse currently house offices, meeting space and our gift shop. Wayne Parker 29:36 Eastern State Penitentiary Historic Site – Part 2 https://storieshere.com/2019/11/eastern-state-penitentiary-historic-site-part-2/ Mon, 25 Nov 2019 00:00:26 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?p=1837 Eastern State Penitentiary Historic Site Conversation with Sean Kelley – Senior Vice President and Director of Interpretation.  This is Part 2 of our conversation. These are remarkable stories....here's a bit of history that's discussed in the episode: “A group of prominent Americans were horrified by the conditions in the jails. They met, just after the American Revolution, in the home of Benjamin Franklin. They had a great 18th century name for their organization: “The Philadelphia Society for Alleviating the Miseries of Public Prisons" and they were the first prison reform group in the world. They believed convicts needed time alone—in silence, to rediscover their good nature. The early prison reformers saw solitary confinement, not as a punishment, but an as opportunity for reflection. A chance to become penitent.” ....but they were wrong, at least in the way Eastern State was built and operated: "There is but one step between the prisoner and insanity.” Inmate James Morton Senator and POW John McCain - "It’s an awful thing, solitary,” John McCain wrote of his five and a half years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam—more than two years of it spent in isolation in a fifteen-by-fifteen-foot cell, unable to communicate with other P.O.W.s except by tap code, secreted notes, or by speaking into an enamel cup pressed against the wall. “It crushes your spirit and weakens your resistance more effectively than any other form of mistreatment.”  Charles Dickens - "I hold this slow and daily tampering with the mysteries of the brain to be immeasurably worse than any torture of the body".  As Hawthorne relates, Dickens visited several prisoners, including one who was about to be released after two years in solitary confinement. Dickens remarked to his guide that “they trembled very much.” Charles Dickens wrote that the two sites in the United States he most wanted to see were “The falls at Niagara” and the Eastern State Penitentiary.    Eastern State Penitentiary Historic Site Conversation with Sean Kelley – Senior Vice President and Director of Interpretation.  This is Part 2 of our conversation. - These are remarkable stories....here's a bit of history that's discussed in the episo... Eastern State Penitentiary Historic Site Conversation with Sean Kelley – Senior Vice President and Director of Interpretation.  This is Part 2 of our conversation.<br /> <br /> These are remarkable stories....here's a bit of history that's discussed in the episode:<br /> <br /> “A group of prominent Americans were horrified by the conditions in the jails. They met, just after the American Revolution, in the home of Benjamin Franklin. They had a great 18th century name for their organization: “The Philadelphia Society for Alleviating the Miseries of Public Prisons" and they were the first prison reform group in the world. They believed convicts needed time alone—in silence, to rediscover their good nature. The early prison reformers saw solitary confinement, not as a punishment, but an as opportunity for reflection. A chance to become penitent.”<br /> <br /> ....but they were wrong, at least in the way Eastern State was built and operated:<br /> <br /> "There is but one step between the prisoner and insanity.” Inmate James Morton<br /> <br /> Senator and POW John McCain - "It’s an awful thing, solitary,” John McCain wrote of his five and a half years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam—more than two years of it spent in isolation in a fifteen-by-fifteen-foot cell, unable to communicate with other P.O.W.s except by tap code, secreted notes, or by speaking into an enamel cup pressed against the wall. “It crushes your spirit and weakens your resistance more effectively than any other form of mistreatment.” <br /> <br /> Charles Dickens - "I hold this slow and daily tampering with the mysteries of the brain to be immeasurably worse than any torture of the body".  <br /> <br /> As Hawthorne relates, Dickens visited several prisoners, including one who was about to be released after two years in solitary confinement. Dickens remarked to his guide that “they trembled very much.”<br /> <br /> Charles Dickens wrote that the two sites in the United States he most wanted to see were “The falls at Niagara” and the Eastern State Penitentiary. <br /> <br />   Wayne Parker 25:50 Eastern State Penitentiary Historic Site – Part 1 https://storieshere.com/2019/11/eastern-state-penitentiary-historic-site-part-1/ Mon, 25 Nov 2019 00:00:18 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?p=1832 Eastern State Penitentiary Historic Site Conversation with Sean Kelley – Senior Vice President and Director of Interpretation.  This is Part 1 of our conversation, and these remarkable stories continue in Part 2. Note from Wayne Parker, Host of the StoriesHere podcast.  "Many years ago while working for the State of California, the newly created SolarCal office, I made an official visit to San Quentin prison with a number of state prison officials.  San Quentin is a maximum security prison and we toured the entire facility, including the death chamber.  The goal at the time was to see if prisoners could be involved in helping produce solar panels in the state.  After the tour we met in Warden George Sumner's office, and he was very emotional, saying 'you have to give me something for them to do'. That story relates to Eastern State, and the mindset of people left continually in solitary confinement with nothing to do. Here's a bit of history of Eastern States that's discussed in the episode: “A group of prominent Americans were horrified by the conditions in the jails. They met, just after the American Revolution, in the home of Benjamin Franklin. They had a great 18th century name for their organization: “The Philadelphia Society for Alleviating the Miseries of Public Prisons" and they were the first prison reform group in the world. They believed convicts needed time alone—in silence, to rediscover their good nature. The early prison reformers saw solitary confinement, not as a punishment, but an as opportunity for reflection. A chance to become penitent.” ....but they were wrong, at least in the way Eastern State was built and operated: "There is but one step between the prisoner and insanity.” Inmate James Morton Senator and POW John McCain - "It’s an awful thing, solitary,” John McCain wrote of his five and a half years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam—more than two years of it spent in isolation in a fifteen-by-fifteen-foot cell, unable to communicate with other P.O.W.s except by tap code, secreted notes, or by speaking into an enamel cup pressed against the wall. “It crushes your spirit and weakens your resistance more effectively than any other form of mistreatment.”  Charles Dickens - "I hold this slow and daily tampering with the mysteries of the brain to be immeasurably worse than any torture of the body".  As Hawthorne relates, Dickens visited several prisoners, including one who was about to be released after two years in solitary confinement. Dickens remarked to his guide that “they trembled very much.” Charles Dickens wrote that the two sites in the United States he most wanted to see were “The falls at Niagara” and the Eastern State Penitentiary.    Eastern State Penitentiary Historic Site Conversation with Sean Kelley – Senior Vice President and Director of Interpretation.  This is Part 1 of our conversation, and these remarkable stories continue in Part 2. - Note from Wayne Parker, Eastern State Penitentiary Historic Site Conversation with Sean Kelley – Senior Vice President and Director of Interpretation.  This is Part 1 of our conversation, and these remarkable stories continue in Part 2.<br /> <br /> Note from Wayne Parker, Host of the StoriesHere podcast.  "Many years ago while working for the State of California, the newly created SolarCal office, I made an official visit to San Quentin prison with a number of state prison officials.  San Quentin is a maximum security prison and we toured the entire facility, including the death chamber.  The goal at the time was to see if prisoners could be involved in helping produce solar panels in the state.  After the tour we met in Warden George Sumner's office, and he was very emotional, saying 'you have to give me something for them to do'.<br /> <br /> That story relates to Eastern State, and the mindset of people left continually in solitary confinement with nothing to do.<br /> <br /> Here's a bit of history of Eastern States that's discussed in the episode:<br /> <br /> “A group of prominent Americans were horrified by the conditions in the jails. They met, just after the American Revolution, in the home of Benjamin Franklin. They had a great 18th century name for their organization: “The Philadelphia Society for Alleviating the Miseries of Public Prisons" and they were the first prison reform group in the world. They believed convicts needed time alone—in silence, to rediscover their good nature. The early prison reformers saw solitary confinement, not as a punishment, but an as opportunity for reflection. A chance to become penitent.”<br /> <br /> ....but they were wrong, at least in the way Eastern State was built and operated:<br /> <br /> "There is but one step between the prisoner and insanity.” Inmate James Morton<br /> <br /> Senator and POW John McCain - "It’s an awful thing, solitary,” John McCain wrote of his five and a half years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam—more than two years of it spent in isolation in a fifteen-by-fifteen-foot cell, unable to communicate with other P.O.W.s except by tap code, secreted notes, or by speaking into an enamel cup pressed against the wall. “It crushes your spirit and weakens your resistance more effectively than any other form of mistreatment.” <br /> <br /> Charles Dickens - "I hold this slow and daily tampering with the mysteries of the brain to be immeasurably worse than any torture of the body".  <br /> <br /> As Hawthorne relates, Dickens visited several prisoners, including one who was about to be released after two years in solitary confinement. Dickens remarked to his guide that “they trembled very much.”<br /> <br /> Charles Dickens wrote that the two sites in the United States he most wanted to see were “The falls at Niagara” and the Eastern State Penitentiary. <br /> <br />   Wayne Parker 25:05 California State Railroad Museum and the First Train Across America https://storieshere.com/2019/10/california-state-railroad-museum-and-the-first-train-across-america/ Mon, 21 Oct 2019 00:26:25 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?p=1853 We’re talking today about the very special California State Railroad Museum, and with the President and CEO of their Foundation that runs the museum, Cheryl Marcell.  The Museum is stunning, in Old Sacramento along the Sacramento River, at the western end of the transcontinental railroad and also the Pony Express.   And you can hear more great episodes at storieshere.com, and also on your favorite podcast service. We’re talking today about the very special California State Railroad Museum, and with the President and CEO of their Foundation that runs the museum, Cheryl Marcell.  The Museum is stunning, in Old Sacramento along the Sacramento River, We’re talking today about the very special California State Railroad Museum, and with the President and CEO of their Foundation that runs the museum, Cheryl Marcell.  The Museum is stunning, in Old Sacramento along the Sacramento River, at the western end of the transcontinental railroad and also the Pony Express.  <br /> <br /> And you can hear more great episodes at storieshere.com, and also on your favorite podcast service. Wayne Parker 38:28 International Coalition of Sites of Conscience https://storieshere.com/2019/10/international-coalition-of-sites-of-conscience/ Thu, 03 Oct 2019 00:00:11 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?p=1866 This episode is our conversation with Braden Paynter, Program Manager for the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience.  Learn more at sitesofconscience.org, and here is a little background... “Founded in 1999, the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience (“the Coalition”) is the only worldwide network of Sites of Conscience. With over 275 members in 65 countries, we build the capacity of these vital institutions through grants, networking, training, transitional justice mechanisms and advocacy. These members and partners remember a variety of histories and come from a wide range of settings – including long-standing democracies, countries struggling with legacies of violence, as well as post-conflict regions just beginning to address their transitional justice needs – but they are all united by their common commitment to connect past to present, memory to action.” This episode is our conversation with Braden Paynter, Program Manager for the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience.  Learn more at sitesofconscience.org, and here is a little background... - “Founded in 1999, This episode is our conversation with Braden Paynter, Program Manager for the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience.  Learn more at sitesofconscience.org, and here is a little background...<br /> <br /> “Founded in 1999, the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience (“the Coalition”) is the only worldwide network of Sites of Conscience. With over 275 members in 65 countries, we build the capacity of these vital institutions through grants, networking, training, transitional justice mechanisms and advocacy. These members and partners remember a variety of histories and come from a wide range of settings – including long-standing democracies, countries struggling with legacies of violence, as well as post-conflict regions just beginning to address their transitional justice needs – but they are all united by their common commitment to connect past to present, memory to action.” Wayne Parker 32:18 Wilton House Museum: A Virginian Story https://storieshere.com/2019/09/wilton-house-museum-a-virginian-story/ Sun, 29 Sep 2019 00:45:00 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?p=1863 What history the Wilton House has seen.  This episode is a conversation with Katie Watkins, Education Director of the Wilton House Museum.  Visitors to the property included Thomas Jefferson, George Washington and Patrick Henry.  It was built 1753, was a tobacco plantation with large slave population, and in many ways at the center of much of early American history. What history the Wilton House has seen.  This episode is a conversation with Katie Watkins, Education Director of the Wilton House Museum.  Visitors to the property included Thomas Jefferson, George Washington and Patrick Henry.  It was built 1753, What history the Wilton House has seen.  This episode is a conversation with Katie Watkins, Education Director of the Wilton House Museum.  Visitors to the property included Thomas Jefferson, George Washington and Patrick Henry.  It was built 1753, was a tobacco plantation with large slave population, and in many ways at the center of much of early American history. Wayne Parker 35:34 The New Burke https://storieshere.com/2019/08/the-new-burke/ Sun, 25 Aug 2019 00:00:08 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?p=1860 Burke Museum Podcast Transcript StoriesHere Interview July 15, 2019 Julie Stein, Burke Museum and Wayne Parker, StoriesHere Wayne: Greetings. This is Wayne Parker letting you know that something remarkable is happening on the north end of the campus of the University of Washington in Seattle.  A new museum is about to open and it is unlike any other.  A new 90 million dollar building is completely replacing the old Museum, and not just a new building but a new way for people to experience a museum. Here's Dr. Julie Stein, Executive Director of the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture to tell us about the new Museum and how this came about.  And then after this podcast find out more at burkemuseum.org.  Julie: Well, the New Burke is I believe something different from most museums if not all museums, and that we truly, truly tried to turn this museum inside out. There's a story I tell about the Old Burke.  The Old Burke was right adjacent to us and it was a fairly traditional museum that had exhibits about dinosaurs and people of the Pacific.  There were cases with objects and labels and you could read a little bit on the label about whatever it was the Curator was trying to tell you. But when you were done looking at those exhibits you would leave.  Maybe you'd buy something at the shop or the cafe, but you would leave and not understand that there were many other things at the Burke behind the walls that you couldn't see. And I used to give people tours of the Burke. And I would take them downstairs to the basement and there were, down there, cases and cases of objects in archaeology and paleontology, open shelving with big mammoth bones and dinosaur bones and eggs of dinosaurs.  And while you were walking along from archaeological cases you’d stop and see a room full of students and employees, staff, undergrads and graduates. They’d be working on a problem that somebody was trying to solve by looking at an object. And you’d continue walking down the hall and you go past offices with people who worked in our finance department or communications. And then by that time people's mouths were hanging open and they'd say, “I had no idea that you had people in here, that they had jobs, that they were working on collections, that you had collections, that there were this many objects”. And then we would go upstairs to the Culture section and they'd see 9,000 baskets and masks and all kinds of beaded clothing and footwear from all over the Pacific.  And then birds and then mammals.   And you're getting my point here.  By the end of a tour, which usually lasted an hour, sometimes I couldn't get people out of there for an hour and a half! They were just overwhelmed with all the information and all of the interesting, difficult issues that people were using the collections to try to address. And it was so clear to me after doing this for 10 years that the new museum had to give that experience to every single visitor.  (3:50)  Wayne: That's Julie Stein, Executive Director of the Burke Museum, talking about a new approach to the museum experience. Her comments really resonate with me since that kind of guided tour experience that she described was our motivation for launching this StoriesHere Podcast. And imagine moving millions of items from one building to another!  Let's hear that story now.  Julie: It's true. We took possession of the New Burke Museum, which is a new building adjacent to the old Burke Museum. We took possession of it in May of 2018, and we couldn't move anything in before the fire department gave us permission. We started moving like crazy and the last object came over on the last day of February in 2019, so that I think is just roughly about nine months. So we thought of it like we were pregnant! Wayne: I want to hear, of course, a lot more about the New Burke.  First, I did want to ask about your interest in this, and what sparked that interest. Burke Museum Podcast Transcript - StoriesHere Interview July 15, 2019 - Julie Stein, Burke Museum and Wayne Parker, StoriesHere - Wayne: Greetings. This is Wayne Parker letting you know that something remarkable is happening on the north end of the ... Burke Museum Podcast Transcript<br /> <br /> StoriesHere Interview July 15, 2019<br /> <br /> Julie Stein, Burke Museum and Wayne Parker, StoriesHere<br /> <br /> Wayne: Greetings. This is Wayne Parker letting you know that something remarkable is happening on the north end of the campus of the University of Washington in Seattle.  A new museum is about to open and it is unlike any other.  A new 90 million dollar building is completely replacing the old Museum, and not just a new building but a new way for people to experience a museum.<br /> <br /> Here's Dr. Julie Stein, Executive Director of the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture to tell us about the new Museum and how this came about.  And then after this podcast find out more at burkemuseum.org. <br /> <br /> Julie: Well, the New Burke is I believe something different from most museums if not all museums, and that we truly, truly tried to turn this museum inside out.<br /> <br /> There's a story I tell about the Old Burke.  The Old Burke was right adjacent to us and it was a fairly traditional museum that had exhibits about dinosaurs and people of the Pacific.  There were cases with objects and labels and you could read a little bit on the label about whatever it was the Curator was trying to tell you.<br /> <br /> But when you were done looking at those exhibits you would leave.  Maybe you'd buy something at the shop or the cafe, but you would leave and not understand that there were many other things at the Burke behind the walls that you couldn't see. And I used to give people tours of the Burke. And I would take them downstairs to the basement and there were, down there, cases and cases of objects in archaeology and paleontology, open shelving with big mammoth bones and dinosaur bones and eggs of dinosaurs.  And while you were walking along from archaeological cases you’d stop and see a room full of students and employees, staff, undergrads and graduates.<br /> <br /> They’d be working on a problem that somebody was trying to solve by looking at an object. And you’d continue walking down the hall and you go past offices with people who worked in our finance department or communications. And then by that time people's mouths were hanging open and they'd say, “I had no idea that you had people in here, that they had jobs, that they were working on collections, that you had collections, that there were this many objects”.<br /> <br /> And then we would go upstairs to the Culture section and they'd see 9,000 baskets and masks and all kinds of beaded clothing and footwear from all over the Pacific.  And then birds and then mammals.  <br /> <br /> And you're getting my point here.  By the end of a tour, which usually lasted an hour, sometimes I couldn't get people out of there for an hour and a half!<br /> <br /> They were just overwhelmed with all the information and all of the interesting, difficult issues that people were using the collections to try to address. And it was so clear to me after doing this for 10 years that the new museum had to give that experience to every single visitor. <br /> <br /> (3:50) <br /> <br /> Wayne: That's Julie Stein, Executive Director of the Burke Museum, talking about a new approach to the museum experience.<br /> <br /> Her comments really resonate with me since that kind of guided tour experience that she described was our motivation for launching this StoriesHere Podcast.<br /> <br /> And imagine moving millions of items from one building to another!  Let's hear that story now. <br /> <br /> Julie: It's true. We took possession of the New Burke Museum, which is a new building adjacent to the old Burke Museum.<br /> <br /> We took possession of it in May of 2018, and we couldn't move anything in before the fire department gave us permission. We started moving like crazy and the last object came over on the last day of February in 2019, so that I think is just roughly about nine months. Wayne Parker 35:09 Folklife Stories https://storieshere.com/2019/08/folklife-stories/ Mon, 05 Aug 2019 00:00:58 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?p=1857 Folklife Stories with John Fenn – This episode includes some surprising stories and a peek into the life of a folklorist.  Those stories range from a shootout in Texas to the work of preserving Native American language and cultural heritage materials. John is the Head of Research & Programs at the American Folklife Center, part of the Library of Congress.  He’s married to a folklorist so his kids think that is what everyone does! The song sample at about 8 minutes is “Coal Miner's Blues” from The ToneWay Project.  Learn more at https://toneway.com/songs/coal-miners-blues Folklife Stories with John Fenn – This episode includes some surprising stories and a peek into the life of a folklorist.  Those stories range from a shootout in Texas to the work of preserving Native American language and cultural heritage materials. Folklife Stories with John Fenn – This episode includes some surprising stories and a peek into the life of a folklorist.  Those stories range from a shootout in Texas to the work of preserving Native American language and cultural heritage materials.<br /> <br /> John is the Head of Research & Programs at the American Folklife Center, part of the Library of Congress.  He’s married to a folklorist so his kids think that is what everyone does!<br /> <br /> The song sample at about 8 minutes is “Coal Miner's Blues” from The ToneWay Project.  Learn more at<br /> <br /> https://toneway.com/songs/coal-miners-blues Wayne Parker 36:43 Museum in the Land of Enchantment https://storieshere.com/2019/07/museum-in-the-land-of-enchantment/ Tue, 30 Jul 2019 04:51:58 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?post_type=podcast&p=1795 This conversation ranges from dinosaurs, stars, drugs, personal computers, and much more...all in the Land of Enchantment.  We are honored to talk with Margie Marino, Executive Director of the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science in Albuquerque.  Visitors of all ages rave about the range of things to do and learn at the Museum.  New Mexico had a sea coast?  Microsoft was founded there?  Those and more surprises in this fun conversation. This conversation ranges from dinosaurs, stars, drugs, personal computers, and much more...all in the Land of Enchantment.  We are honored to talk with Margie Marino, Executive Director of the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science in Albuque... This conversation ranges from dinosaurs, stars, drugs, personal computers, and much more...all in the Land of Enchantment.  We are honored to talk with Margie Marino, Executive Director of the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science in Albuquerque.  Visitors of all ages rave about the range of things to do and learn at the Museum.  New Mexico had a sea coast?  Microsoft was founded there?  Those and more surprises in this fun conversation. Wayne Parker clean Stories from the High Desert https://storieshere.com/2019/07/stories-from-the-high-desert/ Wed, 03 Jul 2019 13:12:19 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?post_type=podcast&p=1751 This episode is an interview with Dana Whitelaw, Executive Director of the High Desert Museum just south of Bend, Oregon.  This Museum is all about wildlife and living history, a place that immerses visitors in the unique environment of Central Oregon’s desert region.  Here's an excerpt from the website at highdesertmuseum.org. This unique museum reveals the natural world and cultural history of the West’s High Desert region through artful exhibits, alluring animals, engaging programs and meaningful history. Whether you’re a local or planning to visit Bend Oregon, discover why we’re a top-rated Thing to Do in Bend by TripAdvisor! The Museum is just 5 minutes south of Bend or 10 minutes north of Sunriver on Highway 97, but it feels like stepping into a different time and place. Get close-up views of native wildlife such as river otters, porcupines and birds of prey. See art through a different lens. Chat with historic characters who’ll share tales of early Oregon explorers and settlers. Visit an authentic homestead and sawmill from 1904. Learn about Native American culture and history, and delight your children with one of many fun, hands-on programs. You’ll be glad you came! This episode is an interview with Dana Whitelaw, Executive Director of the High Desert Museum just south of Bend, Oregon.  This Museum is all about wildlife and living history, a place that immerses visitors in the unique environment of Central Oregon’... This episode is an interview with Dana Whitelaw, Executive Director of the High Desert Museum just south of Bend, Oregon.  This Museum is all about wildlife and living history, a place that immerses visitors in the unique environment of Central Oregon’s desert region.  Here's an excerpt from the website at highdesertmuseum.org.<br /> <br /> This unique museum reveals the natural world and cultural history of the West’s High Desert region through artful exhibits, alluring animals, engaging programs and meaningful history. Whether you’re a local or planning to visit Bend Oregon, discover why we’re a top-rated Thing to Do in Bend by TripAdvisor!<br /> <br /> The Museum is just 5 minutes south of Bend or 10 minutes north of Sunriver on Highway 97, but it feels like stepping into a different time and place. Get close-up views of native wildlife such as river otters, porcupines and birds of prey. See art through a different lens. Chat with historic characters who’ll share tales of early Oregon explorers and settlers. Visit an authentic homestead and sawmill from 1904. Learn about Native American culture and history, and delight your children with one of many fun, hands-on programs. You’ll be glad you came! Wayne Parker clean A Life in Museums https://storieshere.com/2019/06/a-life-in-museums/ Thu, 27 Jun 2019 21:21:58 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?post_type=podcast&p=1740 Among many stories from today's conversation with Alice Parman is the time she was in the ring with Muhammad Ali!  Just one of the many events of note from her career with museums.  Now as a consultant, she helps museums all over the country with their planning and organization.  Part 1 - 8 minutes, Part 2 - 22 minutes. Alice is the author of Exhibit Makeovers: A Do-It-Yourself Workbook for Small Museums. She has been the President of the Oregon Museum Association, taught courses in personand online. She honed her managerial and problem-solving skills as department head at a large museum and director of two smaller non-profits. You can find out more at her website, aparman.com. Among many stories from today's conversation with Alice Parman is the time she was in the ring with Muhammad Ali!  Just one of the many events of note from her career with museums.  Now as a consultant, she helps museums all over the country with their... Among many stories from today's conversation with Alice Parman is the time she was in the ring with Muhammad Ali!  Just one of the many events of note from her career with museums.  Now as a consultant, she helps museums all over the country with their planning and organization.  Part 1 - 8 minutes, Part 2 - 22 minutes.<br /> <br /> Alice is the author of Exhibit Makeovers: A Do-It-Yourself Workbook for Small Museums. She has been the President of the Oregon Museum Association, taught courses in personand online. She honed her managerial and problem-solving skills as department head at a large museum and director of two smaller non-profits. You can find out more at her website, aparman.com. Wayne Parker clean Conversation with a World Champion of Birding https://storieshere.com/2019/05/conversation-with-a-world-champion-of-birding/ Thu, 30 May 2019 16:30:20 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?post_type=podcast&p=1697 Can you guess the place that's the favorite birding spot of a world champion of birding? (spoiler alert: It's in Oregon!). This conversation with Noah Strycker covers his adventures as a young rock-star of birding, far from the birder stereotype and a leader of the resurgence of interest in birding by people of all ages. Noah is the author of the New York Times Editor's Choice book Birding Without Borders about his world record setting 'Big Year'.  It's a remarkable book, with adventures of interest to people whether you are a birder or just like a good rollicking travel story. Can you guess the place that's the favorite birding spot of a world champion of birding? (spoiler alert: It's in Oregon!). This conversation with Noah Strycker covers his adventures as a young rock-star of birding, Can you guess the place that's the favorite birding spot of a world champion of birding? (spoiler alert: It's in Oregon!). This conversation with Noah Strycker covers his adventures as a young rock-star of birding, far from the birder stereotype and a leader of the resurgence of interest in birding by people of all ages.<br /> <br /> Noah is the author of the New York Times Editor's Choice book Birding Without Borders about his world record setting 'Big Year'.  It's a remarkable book, with adventures of interest to people whether you are a birder or just like a good rollicking travel story. Wayne Parker clean First Around the World Flight https://storieshere.com/2019/05/eugene-air-park/ Sat, 04 May 2019 06:11:21 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?post_type=podcast&p=1683 The first round-the-world airplane flight started where?  Bob Hart, Executive Director of the Lane County History Museum describes the original Eugene Air Park, built at the urging of Mahlon Sweet, whose name was given to today's main airport in Eugene. Image: Eugene Airport The first round-the-world airplane flight started where?  Bob Hart, Executive Director of the Lane County History Museum describes the original Eugene Air Park, built at the urging of Mahlon Sweet, whose name was given to today's main airport in Eugene... The first round-the-world airplane flight started where?  Bob Hart, Executive Director of the Lane County History Museum describes the original Eugene Air Park, built at the urging of Mahlon Sweet, whose name was given to today's main airport in Eugene. Image: Eugene Airport Wayne Parker clean Intriguing Stories of Oregon’s History https://storieshere.com/2019/05/unique-stories-of-oregon-history/ Wed, 01 May 2019 21:30:30 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?post_type=podcast&p=1689 Many surprising stories in this episode, from a conversation with Bob Hart, Executive Director of the Lane County History Museum.  Find out more about the Museum at lchm.org. Many surprising stories in this episode, from a conversation with Bob Hart, Executive Director of the Lane County History Museum.  Find out more about the Museum at lchm.org. Many surprising stories in this episode, from a conversation with Bob Hart, Executive Director of the Lane County History Museum.  Find out more about the Museum at lchm.org. Wayne Parker clean The 10,000 Year Old Sandal https://storieshere.com/2019/04/the-10000-year-old-sandal/ Mon, 08 Apr 2019 22:36:46 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?post_type=podcast&p=1477 There are many wonderful surprises in this episode, a conversation with Dr. Tom Connolly, Director of Archeological Research at the University of Oregon. For example, the stories of the 10,000 year old intact sandals.  And then learning that the archeology of Oregon is of surprising depth and importance.  Oh, and yes, about those camels…. Image: Museum of Natural and Cultural History There are many wonderful surprises in this episode, a conversation with Dr. Tom Connolly, Director of Archeological Research at the University of Oregon. - For example, the stories of the 10,000 year old intact sandals. There are many wonderful surprises in this episode, a conversation with Dr. Tom Connolly, Director of Archeological Research at the University of Oregon.<br /> <br /> For example, the stories of the 10,000 year old intact sandals.  And then learning that the archeology of Oregon is of surprising depth and importance.  Oh, and yes, about those camels….<br /> <br /> Image: Museum of Natural and Cultural History Wayne Parker clean So Why Did They Circle The Wagons? https://storieshere.com/2019/04/surprising-stories-from-the-oregon-trail/ Tue, 02 Apr 2019 14:21:54 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?post_type=podcast&p=1442 Pioneer stories from an interview with Bethany Nemec of the End of the Oregon Trail Interpretive Center. Pioneer stories from an interview with Bethany Nemec of the End of the Oregon Trail Interpretive Center. Pioneer stories from an interview with Bethany Nemec of the End of the Oregon Trail Interpretive Center. Wayne Parker clean Portland Beginnings and the Pittock Mansion https://storieshere.com/2019/03/pittock-mansion-building-portland/ Thu, 28 Mar 2019 16:22:11 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?post_type=podcast&p=1431 The early days of Portland, Oregon, as told through this interview with Patti Larkin, Curator of the Pittock Mansion. Henry Pittock was the owner of the Oregonian newspaper, who came across on the Oregon Trail and became one of the most influential people in early Oregon. The early days of Portland, Oregon, as told through this interview with Patti Larkin, Curator of the Pittock Mansion. Henry Pittock was the owner of the Oregonian newspaper, who came across on the Oregon Trail and became one of the most influential pe... The early days of Portland, Oregon, as told through this interview with Patti Larkin, Curator of the Pittock Mansion. Henry Pittock was the owner of the Oregonian newspaper, who came across on the Oregon Trail and became one of the most influential people in early Oregon. Wayne Parker clean Raptor Magic https://storieshere.com/2019/02/raptor-magic/ Sun, 10 Feb 2019 09:46:37 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?post_type=podcast&p=983 A visit with the Executive Director of the Cascades Raptor Center, Louise Shimmel. You may be very surprised at what raptors can do! A visit with the Executive Director of the Cascades Raptor Center, Louise Shimmel. You may be very surprised at what raptors can do! A visit with the Executive Director of the Cascades Raptor Center, Louise Shimmel. You may be very surprised at what raptors can do! Wayne Parker clean Showdown at Opal Creek https://storieshere.com/2019/02/showdown-at-opal-creek/ Sun, 10 Feb 2019 06:50:43 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?post_type=podcast&p=1149 The amazing story of Opal Creek Wilderness, told through an interview with Katie Ryan. The amazing story of Opal Creek Wilderness, told through an interview with Katie Ryan. The amazing story of Opal Creek Wilderness, told through an interview with Katie Ryan. Wayne Parker clean An Oregon Safe House https://storieshere.com/2019/02/mims-house/ Sat, 09 Feb 2019 08:33:29 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?post_type=podcast&p=764 This interview with Eric Richardson tells the story of the Mims House, a 'Safe House' in Eugene. Many people are surprised to learn that blacks weren't welcome to stay overnight, even into the 1960s.  Eric grew up knowing the Mims family and is President of the Eugene / Springfield Chapter of the NAACP. This interview with Eric Richardson tells the story of the Mims House, a 'Safe House' in Eugene. Many people are surprised to learn that blacks weren't welcome to stay overnight, even into the 1960s.  Eric grew up knowing the Mims family and is Preside... This interview with Eric Richardson tells the story of the Mims House, a 'Safe House' in Eugene. Many people are surprised to learn that blacks weren't welcome to stay overnight, even into the 1960s.  Eric grew up knowing the Mims family and is President of the Eugene / Springfield Chapter of the NAACP. Wayne Parker clean The Anarchist and the Whiteaker https://storieshere.com/2019/02/the-whiteaker-john-zerzan-interview/ Wed, 06 Feb 2019 07:00:15 +0000 https://www.storieshere.com/?post_type=podcast&p=1151 John Zerzan describes the history of the Whiteaker neighborhood and the many things that make Eugene unique. John Zerzan describes the history of the Whiteaker neighborhood and the many things that make Eugene unique. John Zerzan describes the history of the Whiteaker neighborhood and the many things that make Eugene unique. Wayne Parker clean